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Standard immunizations for children and adolescents: Overview

Author
Jan E Drutz, MD
Section Editors
Teresa K Duryea, MD
Morven S Edwards, MD
Deputy Editor
Mary M Torchia, MD

INTRODUCTION

Routine immunization schedules vary from country to country. This topic will provide an overview of immunization for children and adolescents in the United States. Immunization schedules for other countries are available through the World Health Organization.

Detailed information about individual vaccines, vaccine refusal or hesitancy, and vaccination for adults is provided separately.

(See "Hepatitis B virus immunization in infants, children, and adolescents".)

(See "Rotavirus vaccines for infants".)

(See "Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunization in infants and children 0 through 6 years of age".)

                                    
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Literature review current through: Sep 2017. | This topic last updated: Oct 06, 2017.
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