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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,3

of 'Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) septic complications'

2
TI
Review article: antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).
AU
Subhani JM, Kibbler C, Dooley JS
SO
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1999;13(2):103.
 
This review examines the evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan-creatography (ERCP), and provides detailed advice about suitable antibiotic regimens in appropriate high-risk patients. Ascending cholangitis and infective endocarditis are potential complications of endoscopic ERCP. The pathophysiology of these two complications is quite separate and different sub-groups of patients require prophylaxis with appropriate antibiotic regimens. Ascending cholangitis results from bacterial infection of an obstructed biliary system, usually from enteric Gram-negative microorganisms, resulting in bacteraemia. There is incomplete drainage of the biliary system after ERCP in up to 10% of patients who require stenting. Antibiotics started in these patients will probably reduce the frequency of cholangitis by 80%. If antibiotics are restricted to this group, approximately 90% of all patients having an ERCP will avoid antibiotics, but 80% of cholangitic episodes will be prevented. Infective endocarditis may result from the bacteraemia caused at the time of the ERCP in patients with an abnormal heart valve. Antibiotic prophylaxis, in particular covering alpha-haemolytic streptococci, should be started before the procedure in this defined high-risk group.
AD
Department of Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. javald@glbalnet.co.uk
PMID
3
TI
Biliary tract infection or colonization with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica after endoscopic procedures involving the biliary tract.
AU
Zong Z
SO
Intern Med. 2015;54(1):11-5. Epub 2015 1 1.
 
OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to investigate the clinical significance of detecting Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in the bile.
METHODS: We herein report a case series of biliary colonization or infection with E. meningoseptica. Twenty patients with E. meningoseptica recovered from the bile were treated at a 4,300-bed teaching hospital in China between January 2009 and December 2012. The clinical information for the cases of E. meningoseptica recovered from the bile and the microbiological data of the E. meningoseptica isolates were examined.
RESULTS: Most of the 20 patients were not immunocompromised, although they had cholelithiasis and had recently received antimicrobial agents. All cases were treated with indwelling nasobiliary tubes and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and/or endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to the detection of E. meningoseptica in the bile. The average time between the placement of the nasobiliary tube and the detection of E. meningoseptica in the bile was 6.6 days. E. meningoseptica caused cholangitis in five cases, one of which also involved secondary septicemia, and colonized the nasobiliary tubes or biliary tract in the remaining 15 cases. All but two patients recovered and were discharged. Two patients died of septicemia; E. meningoseptica and Escherichia coli were the causative pathogens in one case and other organisms were the causative pathogens in the other.
CONCLUSION: E. meningoseptica is an unusual causative pathogen of healthcare-associated cholangitis. Cholangitis resulting from this bacterium is generally associated with good outcomes, although secondary septicemia can be life-threatening.
AD
Center of Infectious Diseases, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China.
PMID