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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 7

of 'Pathophysiology of and immune response to Helicobacter pylori infection'

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Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.
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Kusters JG, van Vliet AH, Kuipers EJ
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Clin Microbiol Rev. 2006;19(3):449.
 
Helicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection represents a key factor in the etiology of various gastrointestinal diseases, ranging from chronic active gastritis without clinical symptoms to peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is the result of the complex interplay between the host and the bacterium. Host immune gene polymorphisms and gastric acid secretion largely determine the bacterium's ability to colonize a specific gastric niche. Bacterial virulence factors such as the cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island-encoded protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA aid in this colonization of the gastric mucosa and subsequently seem to modulate the host's immune system. This review focuses on the microbiological, clinical, immunological, and biochemical aspects of the pathogenesis of H. pylori.
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Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands. j.g.kusters@erasmusmc.nl
PMID