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Intraoperative management of shock in adults

Authors
Carmen Hrymak, MD
Duane J Funk, MD, FRCP(C)
Michael F O'Connor, MD, FCCM
Eric Jacobsohn, MBChB, MHPE, FRCPC
Section Editor
Michael Avidan, MD
Deputy Editor
Nancy A Nussmeier, MD, FAHA

INTRODUCTION

Shock is a condition of circulatory failure with decreased oxygen delivery to body tissues that results in cellular hypoxia and life-threatening end-organ dysfunction.

This topic reviews intraoperative resuscitation and anesthetic management for patients with reversible causes of shock. Management of shock in other settings (eg, emergency department, intensive care unit) may overlap with the perioperative period, as discussed in separate topics:

(See "Evaluation of and initial approach to the adult patient with undifferentiated hypotension and shock", section on 'Clinical manifestations'.)

(See "Initial evaluation and management of shock in adult trauma".)

(See "Evaluation and management of suspected sepsis and septic shock in adults".)

                                             

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Literature review current through: Jul 2017. | This topic last updated: Aug 10, 2017.
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