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Immunizations in patients with primary immunodeficiency

Author
Francisco A Bonilla, MD, PhD
Section Editor
E Richard Stiehm, MD
Deputy Editor
Anna M Feldweg, MD

INTRODUCTION

Infections in patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) often result in excessive morbidity and mortality, and antimicrobial therapy may be less effective than in the unimpaired host. Therefore, prevention through vaccination is an important component of care for patients with these diseases [1].

This topic review will discuss immunizations in patients with PID disorders. Other measures to prevent infection in this patient population include immune globulin therapy, prophylactic antimicrobials, and lifestyle modifications, which are reviewed separately. (See "Primary immunodeficiency: Overview of management".)

Topics on vaccination of patients with various forms of secondary immunodeficiency are found separately:

(See "Immunizations in adults with cancer".)

(See "Immunizations in HIV-infected patients".)

                                 
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Literature review current through: Sep 2017. | This topic last updated: Apr 13, 2017.
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References
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