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General anesthesia: Induction

Authors
Adam King, MD
Liza M Weavind, MBBCh, FCCM, MMHC
Section Editor
Girish P Joshi, MB, BS, MD, FFARCSI
Deputy Editor
Nancy A Nussmeier, MD, FAHA

INTRODUCTION

General anesthesia establishes a reversible state that includes:

Hypnosis

Amnesia

Analgesia

Akinesia

                
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Literature review current through: Sep 2017. | This topic last updated: Sep 07, 2017.
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References
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