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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 14

of 'Epidemiology and pathophysiology of diphtheria'

14
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Diphtheria immunity in UK blood donors.
AU
Maple PA, Efstratiou A, George RC, Andrews NJ, Sesardic D
SO
Lancet. 1995;345(8955):963.
 
Immunity to diphtheria was determined in serum samples from 1000 UK-born blood donors at the North London Blood Transfusion Centre during a three-month period in 1993; 125 women and 125 men were stratified in 10-year age groups, from 20 to 59. A tissue (vero cell)-culture toxin-neutralisation assay was used to measure serum diphtheria antitoxin concentrations. According to internationally accepted definitions (antitoxin<0.01 IU/mL = susceptibility, 0.01-0.09 IU/mL = basic protection, and>or = 0.1 IU/mL = full protection), 37.6% of donors were susceptible to diphtheria, 31.5% had basic protection, and 30.9% were fully protected. Log-linear modelling of the influence of age and sex on population immunity showed a significant trend (p<0.001) of decreasing immunity with increasing age: 25.2% of donors aged 20-29 were susceptible compared with 52.8% of those aged 50-59. There was a small sex effect (p = 0.052); similar proportions of men and women were susceptible, but fewer women had full protection. There was no age-sex interaction on immunity (p = 0.454). Our results suggest that booster immunisation of adults is necessary to increase herd immunity of the adult population.
AD
Respiratory and Systemic Infection Laboratory, Central Public Health Laboratory, London, UK.
PMID