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Medline ® Abstracts for References 3,4

of 'Endoscopic balloon dilatation for removal of bile duct stones'

3
TI
Biliary manometry, bacterial characteristics, bile composition, and histologic changes fifteen to seventeen years after endoscopic sphincterotomy.
AU
Bergman JJ, van Berkel AM, Groen AK, Schoeman MN, Offerhaus J, Tytgat GN, Huibregtse K
SO
Gastrointest Endosc. 1997;45(5):400.
 
AIM: To evaluate the function of the biliary sphincter 15 to 17 years after endoscopic sphincterotomy and to investigate if loss of sphincter function is associated with bacterial colonization, changes in bile composition, or inflammation of the biliary system.
METHODS: Eight patients who had undergone endoscopic sphincterotomy for bile duct stones 15 to 17 years previously underwent ERCP with biliary manometry, bile sampling, and biopsy. Manometry was performed using a perfused triple-lumen manometry catheter and a station pull-through technique. Bile samples were cultured and analyzed for biliary lipids, bile salts, bacterial beta-glucuronidase, and phospholipase A2. Biopsy specimens were taken from the proximal common heptic duct for histologic examination.
RESULTS: Manometry demonstrated absent basal sphincter pressure and no choledochoduodenal pressure gradient in all patients. Phasic contractions were observed in two patients. Cholangiography showed stones in one patient. Positive cultures were obtained in three patients, including the patient with stones. All bile samples showed a high content of biliary lipids and cholesterol. Some samples contained considerable amounts of hydrophobic bile salts. Five samples contained very high levels of phospholipase A2 activity. Significant bacterial beta-glucuronidase activity was found in one patient, the patient with stones. Biopsy specimens of the proximal common hepatic duct in three patients showed chronic inflammation with fibrosis and reactive epithelial changes.
CONCLUSIONS: After endoscopic sphincterotomy for bile duct stones, the function of the biliary sphincter is permanently lost. This is associated with bacterial colonization, presence of cytotoxic components in the bile, and chronic inflammation of the biliary system.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Center, University of AMsterdam, The Netherlands.
PMID
4
TI
Long-term follow-up after endoscopic sphincterotomy for bile duct stones in patients younger than 60 years of age.
AU
Bergman JJ, van der Mey S, Rauws EA, Tijssen JG, Gouma DJ, Tytgat GN, Huibregtse K
SO
Gastrointest Endosc. 1996;44(6):643.
 
BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term effects of endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy.
METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the rate of late complications after endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) for bile duct stones. Patients had to meet the following inclusion criteria: (1) treated between 1976 and 1980, (2) complete stone removal after EST, (3) prior cholecystectomy or elective cholecystectomy within 2 months after EST, and (4) 60 years old or younger at the time of ERCP. A total of 100 patients were identified. Information was obtained from general practitioners and patients by telephone. Patients completed a postal questionnaire and a blood sample was obtained for liver function tests.
RESULTS: Information was obtained for 94 patients (in the majority of cases [87%]from multiple sources). There were 26 men and 68 women with a mean age of 51 years at the time of ERCP (range, 23 to 60 years). Early complications (<30 days) occurred in 14 patients (15%). One patient died of a retroperitoneal perforation secondary to EST. During a median period of 15 years (range, 3 to 18 years), 22patients (24%) developed a total of 36 late complications. There were 21 patients with symptoms of recurrent bile duct stones and one patient with biliary pancreatitis. Other late complications, such as recurrent ascending cholangitis or malignant degeneration, were not observed. An ERCP was performed in 20 of the 22 patients with late complications and demonstrated bile duct stones in 13, combined with stenosis of the EST opening in 9 patients. Late complications were initially managed endoscopically and/or conservatively. One patient underwent surgery after failed endoscopic treatment and one patient died of cholangitis before she could undergo an ERCP. Twelve other patients died of unrelated causes during follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS: After EST for bile duct stones, late complications occur in a significant proportion of patients. Stone recurrence remains the most important problem, but can in general be managed endoscopically.
AD
Department of Gastroenterology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
PMID