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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 22

of 'Endoscopic balloon dilatation for removal of bile duct stones'

22
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Endoscopic sphincteroclasy: a useful therapeutic tool for biliary endoscopy in Billroth II gastrectomy patients.
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Prat F, Fritsch J, Choury AD, Meduri B, Pelletier G, Buffet C
SO
Endoscopy. 1997;29(2):79.
 
BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Endoscopic exploration of the common bile duct is generally more difficult and hazardous in patients with a Billroth II gastrectomy than in patients with normal anatomy. Hydrostatic dilation of the papilla, which we term "endoscopic sphincteroclasy", provides a useful alternative to sphincterotomy in such patients.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Endoscopic sphincteroclasy was carried out in five patients with a Billroth II anastomosis. There were four men and one woman, aged 58 to 90 years. One patients was cirrhotic, with impaired coagulation. Four presented with typical cholangitis, and one had pain and jaundice. The common bile duct was dilated in all five patients. Four had choledocholithiasis and one had a cholangiocarcinoma.
RESULTS: Sphincteroclasy was carried out with balloon dilators mounted on 0.035-inch guide wires. Immediate extraction of stones was achieved in three of the four patients with choledocholithiasis. In one case, a control endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was necessary to remove residual stones, without additional dilation. Insertion of the endoprosthesis was possible without difficulty in the patient with a malignant stricture. None of the patients required a sphincterotomy. No complications were observed up to six months after the sphincteroclasy.
CONCLUSIONS: We recommend the use of endoscopic sphincteroclasy in patients with a Billroth II gastrectomy who require endoscopic therapy, as well as in patients in need of emergency bile duct decompression who have impaired coagulation.
AD
Hepatogastroenterology Service, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bicêtre, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.
PMID