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Detailed neurologic assessment of infants and children

Author
Suresh Kotagal, MD
Section Editor
Douglas R Nordli, Jr, MD
Deputy Editor
Carrie Armsby, MD, MPH

INTRODUCTION

Children who present with or who are found to have neurologic or neuromuscular abnormalities on a general physical examination should undergo a complete neurologic assessment [1,2]. The elements of a complete neurologic assessment are:

Focused clinical history

Detailed neurologic examination

Additional parts of the general physical examination that are relevant to child neurology

In some cases, developmental screening tests are also helpful.

                                            
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Literature review current through: Nov 2017. | This topic last updated: Aug 01, 2017.
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References
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