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Cardiovascular disease risk assessment for primary prevention: Our approach

Author
Peter WF Wilson, MD
Section Editor
Bernard J Gersh, MB, ChB, DPhil, FRCP, MACC
Deputy Editors
Howard Libman, MD, FACP
Brian C Downey, MD, FACC

INTRODUCTION

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is common in the general population, affecting the majority of adults past the age of 60 years. As a diagnostic category, CVD includes four major areas:

Coronary heart disease (CHD) manifested by fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), angina pectoris, and/or heart failure (HF)

Cerebrovascular disease manifested by fatal or nonfatal stroke and transient ischemic attack

Peripheral artery disease manifested by intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia

Aortic atherosclerosis and thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysm

                 
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Literature review current through: Sep 2017. | This topic last updated: Sep 15, 2017.
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