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Medline ® Abstracts for References 4,5,7-11

of 'Botryomycosis'

4
TI
Immunologic abnormalities in botryomycosis. A case report with review of the literature.
AU
Brunken RC, Lichon-Chao N, van der Broek H
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1983;9(3):428.
 
Botryomycosis in an uncommon chronic bacterial infection that mimics fungal disease clinically and histologically. Microscopically the hallmark of the disease is the presence of fungus-like granules in which the causative organism is embedded. A patient with typical cutaneous botryomycosis is presented, along with the immunologic abnormalities discovered on laboratory examination. The botryomycosis literature is reviewed, with special emphasis on the immunologic status of the host. Additional studies of the causative organism and cell-mediated immunity in the host in future patients with botryomycosis may help to further elucidate the pathogenesis of this most interesting disease.
AD
PMID
5
TI
Cutaneous botryomycosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
AU
Patterson JW, Kitces EN, Neafie RC
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1987;16(1 Pt 2):238.
 
A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presented with multiple pruritic papules and nodules over the trunk and extremities. Biopsy specimens from two of these lesions contained granules within abscesses of the papillary dermis. There were numerous gram-positive cocci within the granules. Culture of one lesion failed to produce growth. A mouse inoculated with tissue from a lesion revealed no evidence of sepsis or organ involvement. The skin lesions showed no obvious response to systemic antimicrobial therapy but gradually resolved after treatment had been discontinued. Such lesions should be clinically distinguished from other cutaneous manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, such as Kaposi's sarcoma.
AD
PMID
7
TI
Renal botryomycosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma.
AU
Yörükoğlu K, Ozer E, Sade M, Biberoğlu K, Kirkali Z
SO
J Urol. 1998;159(6):2076.
 
AD
Department of Pathology, Dokuz Eylül University, School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey.
PMID
8
TI
Pulmonary botryomycosis in a patient with AIDS.
AU
Katapadi K, Pujol F, Vuletin JC, Katapadi M, Pachter BR
SO
Chest. 1996;109(1):276.
 
We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of the first reported case of pulmonary botryomycosis in a patient with AIDS. Botryomycosis is an uncommon, chronic, suppurative disease that is often mistaken clinically and histologically for a fungal infection. The patient responded to systemic antibiotic therapy.
AD
Department of Medicine and Pathology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn 11215, USA.
PMID
9
TI
Primary pulmonary botryomycosis. A manifestation of chronic granulomatous disease.
AU
Paz HL, Little BJ, Ball WC Jr, Winkelstein JA
SO
Chest. 1992;101(4):1160.
 
A 19-year-old woman with a childhood history of cavitating left upper lobe pneumonia presented with persistent weight loss, fever, cough and roentgenographic evidence of right upper lobe pneumonia resistant to antibiotic therapy. An open lung biopsy led to the diagnosis of botryomycosis. Neutrophil function studies including flow cytometric evaluation of oxidative burst, bacterial killing and evaluation of neutrophil cytosolic proteins required for oxidase activation were consistent with chronic granulomatous disease. This is the first case report of primary pulmonary botryomycosis as a clinical manifestation of CGD. Other recent cases of immunodeficiency states associated with botryomycosis are reviewed.
AD
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.
PMID
10
TI
Botryomycosis.
AU
Hacker P
SO
Int J Dermatol. 1983;22(8):455.
 
Botryomycosis is a subacute or chronic bacterial infection, which is characterized by a granulomatous response and granules in which the microorganisms are embedded by a hyaline matrix. It may be caused by several pyogenic bacteria. The mechanism of granule formation is not understood. Treatment is with surgical drainage or resection, whenever possible, and prolonged use of the appropriate antibiotics.
AD
PMID
11
TI
Botryomycosis in pierced ears.
AU
Olmstead PM, Finn M
SO
Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(11):925.
 
AD
PMID