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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 43

of 'Approach to acute abdominal pain in pregnant and postpartum women'

43
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Acute appendicitis in the pregnant patient.
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Tamir IL, Bongard FS, Klein SR
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Am J Surg. 1990;160(6):571.
 
Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical problem in pregnancy requiring emergent intervention. To establish a contemporary patient profile and formulate an effective management strategy, a retrospective review was conducted of 84 pregnant patients who underwent laparotomy with a preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Gestational stage at presentation included the first trimester in 27 patients (32%), the second trimester in 37 patients (44%), the third trimester in 13 patients (16%), and the puerperium in 7 patients (8%). Fifty-four patients (64%) had pathologically proven acute appendicitis; the incidence did not vary by trimester. Other intra-abdominal conditions were detected in 15 patients (18%). There were no significant differences between patients with positive and negative laparotomies (or among trimesters) regarding frequency of presenting symptoms and signs or laboratory results. Operation occurred within 24 hours of symptom onset in 19 of 54 (35%) instances of proven acute appendicitis. Perforation occurred in 23 of 54 patients (43%), all of whom had symptoms exceeding 24 hours (p less than 0.0005). Five instances of perinatal death and one case of extreme perinatal morbidity were associated with negative laparotomies; only one of these was attributed to operation itself. No adverse long-term maternal morbidity or mortality occurred. Wound infection developed in seven cases of acute appendicitis (six perforated) and two negative explorations. We conclude that (1) gestationalphysiologic changes obscure the accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis; (2) the natural history of acute appendicitis is not affected by trimester of presentation; and (3) adverse sequelae of acute appendicitis are obviated by prompt operative exploration and prevention of appendiceal perforation.
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Department of Surgery, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance 90509.
PMID