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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 45

of 'Acute and early HIV infection: Treatment'

45
TI
HIV type 1 (HIV-1) proviral reservoirs decay continuously under sustained virologic control in HIV-1-infected children who received early treatment.
AU
Luzuriaga K, Tabak B, Garber M, Chen YH, Ziemniak C, McManus MM, Murray D, Strain MC, Richman DD, Chun TW, Cunningham CK, Persaud D
SO
J Infect Dis. 2014;210(10):1529. Epub 2014 May 21.
 
BACKGROUND: Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality.
METHODS: Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection,<2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1-specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1-infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth.
RESULTS: Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1-specific immune responses.
CONCLUSIONS: Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies.
AD
Program in Molecular Medicine Department of Pediatrics Center for Clinical and Translational Science, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester.
PMID