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Medline ® Abstracts for References 9,12

of '儿童夜间遗尿症:治疗'

9
TI
Enuresis.
AU
Jalkut MW, Lerman SE, Churchill BM
SO
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2001;48(6):1461.
 
The authors do not have all of the data about enuresis, and many children are subject to relapses or failure of treatment. There is no cause for despondency, however. Enuresis is no longer a mystery. Good data exist about the natural history, epidemiology, and etiology of enuresis. In addition, multiple treatment modalities are available to practitioners. This article has sought to review the scientific literature and to relate the authors' experience with enuresis. The authors recommend a treatment program for children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis that includes removal of caffeine from the diet. Enuretic children do not consume enough fluid, and the authors recommend that the daily fluid requirement be divided during the day: 40% in the morning, 40% in the afternoon, and 20% in the evening, with no restriction of fluid. Normalization of small functional bladder capacities may help to cure enuresis and has an effect on the efficacy of other therapies. Treatment of enuretics with antibiotics is effective in children with UTI, bacteriuria, or cystitis cystica. DDAVP has been shown to be effective in the treatment of enuresis, especially in children who have achieved a normal functional bladder capacity. Bladder alarm systems also offer a potential cure of enuresis, are inexpensive, and show a low relapse rate.
AD
Division of Pediatric Urology, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Urology, Clark-Morrison Children's Urological Center, University of California Los Angeles Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, California, USA.
PMID
12
TI
Primary nocturnal enuresis: current.
AU
Cendron M
SO
Am Fam Physician. 1999;59(5):1205.
 
Primary nocturnal enuresis sometimes presents significant psychosocial problems for children and their parents. Causative factors may include maturational delay, genetic influence, difficulties in waking and decreased nighttime secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Anatomic abnormalities are usually not found, and psychologic causes are unlikely. Evaluation of enuresis usually requires no more than a complete history, a focused physical examination, and urine specific gravity and dipstick tests. Nonpharmacologic treatments include motivational therapy, behavioral conditioning and bladder-training exercises. Pharmacologic therapy includes imipramine, anticholinergic medication and desmopressin. These drugs have been used with varying degrees of success.
AD
Section of Urology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756-0001, USA. Marc.Cendron@Hitchcock.org
PMID