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Medline ® Abstracts for References 4,5,26

of '儿童夜间遗尿症:治疗'

4
TI
Evaluation of and treatment for monosymptomatic enuresis: a standardization document from the International Children's Continence Society.
AU
Neveus T, Eggert P, Evans J, Macedo A, Rittig S, Tekgül S, Vande Walle J, Yeung CK, Robson L, International Children's Continence Society
SO
J Urol. 2010;183(2):441.
 
PURPOSE: We provide updated, clinically useful recommendations for treating children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Evidence was gathered from the literature and experience was gathered from the authors with priority given to evidence when present. The draft document was circulated among all members of the International Children's Continence Society as well as other relevant expert associations before completion.
RESULTS: Available evidence suggests that children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis could primarily be treated by a primary care physician or an adequately educated nurse. The mainstays of primary evaluation are a proper history and a voiding chart. The mainstays of primary therapy are bladder advice, the enuresis alarm and/or desmopressin. Therapy resistant cases should be handled by a specialist doctor. Among the recommended second line therapies are anticholinergics and in select cases imipramine.
CONCLUSIONS: Enuresis in a child older than 5 years is not a trivial condition, and needs proper evaluation and treatment. This requires time but usually does not demand costly or invasive procedures.
AD
Nephrology Unit, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. tryggve.neveus@kbh.uu.se
PMID
5
 
 
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Nocturnal enuresis - the management of bedwetting in children and young people. www.nice.org.uk/guidance/index.jsp?action=download&o=51367 (Accessed on February 28, 2011).
 
no abstract available
26
TI
Nocturnal enuresis: what is happening?
AU
Harari MD, Moulden A
SO
J Paediatr Child Health. 2000;36(1):78.
 
Primary nocturnal enuresis is common and has considerable psychological ramifications for children as they get older. It is a familial condition with complex inheritance patterns. The pathophysiology of the condition appears to be related to poor arousal from sleep, nocturia due to deficient vasopressin release in sleep and possibly a decrease in functional bladder capacity especially at night. The mainstay of treatment is the bed-wetting alarm. In recent years, desmopressin nasal spray has found a clinical niche as a short-term solution for children attending school camps or sleeping over at friends' houses and as treatment in the medium term for those unresponsive to treatment with a bed-wetting alarm. It may also be used as an adjunct to the use of the alarm. Treatment with imipramine is increasingly in disfavour because the relapse rate is unacceptably high and fatal overdose is a real possibility.
AD
Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
PMID