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Medline ® Abstracts for References 21,23-25

of '儿童夜间遗尿症:治疗'

21
TI
Alarm interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
AU
Glazener CM, Evans JH, Peto RE
SO
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;
 
BACKGROUND: Enuresis (bedwetting) is a socially disruptive and stressful condition which affects around 15 to 20% of five year olds, and up to 2% of young adults.
OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of alarm interventions on nocturnal enuresis in children, and to compare alarms with other interventions.
SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group specialised trials register (searched 22 November 2004) and the reference lists of relevant articles.
SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised or quasi-randomised trials of alarm interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children were included, except those focused solely on daytime wetting. Comparison interventions included no treatment, simple and complex behavioural methods, desmopressin, tricyclics, and miscellaneous other methods.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of the eligible trials, and extracted data.
MAIN RESULTS: Fifty five trials met the inclusion criteria, involving 3152 children of whom 2345 used an alarm. The quality of many trials was poor, and evidence for many comparisons was inadequate. Most alarms used audio methods. Compared to no treatment, about two thirds of children became dry during alarm use (RR for failure 0.38, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.45). Nearly half who persisted with alarm use remained dry after treatment finished, compared to almost none after no treatment (RR of failure or relapse 45/81 (55%) vs 80/81 (99%), RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.68). There was insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about different types of alarm, or about how alarms compare to other behavioural interventions. Relapse rates were lower when overlearning was added to alarm treatment (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.92) or if dry bed training was used as well (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.25 to 3.20). Penalties for wet beds appeared to be counter-productive. Alarms using electric shocks were unacceptable to children or their parents. Although desmopressin may have a more immediate effect, alarms appear more effective by the end of a course of treatment (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.99) and there was limited evidence of greater long-term success (4/22 (18%) vs 16/24 (67%), RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.69). Evidence about the benefit of supplementing alarm treatment with desmopressin was conflicting. Alarms were better than tricyclics during treatment (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.88) and afterwards (7/12 (58%) vs 12/12 (100%), RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.94).
AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Alarm interventions are an effective treatment for nocturnal bedwetting in children. Alarms appear more effective than desmopressin or tricyclics by the end of treatment, and subsequently. Overlearning (giving extra fluids at bedtime after successfully becoming dry using an alarm), dry bed training and avoiding penalties may further reduce the relapse rate. Better quality research comparing alarms with other treatments is needed, including follow-up to determine relapse rates.
AD
Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK, AB25 2ZD. c.glazener@abdn.ac.uk
PMID
23
TI
Comparison of desmopressin and enuresis alarm for nocturnal enuresis.
AU
Wille S
SO
Arch Dis Child. 1986;61(1):30.
 
Fifty children with primary nocturnal enuresis were randomised for a study comparing desmopressin (DDAVP) and enuresis alarm. Forty six completed the trial, 24 of whom were treated with 20 micrograms intranasal desmopressin nightly and 22 with enuresis alarm for three months. Failures were crossed over and relapses were continued on the same treatment for a further three months. The improvement rate was 70% in the group given desmopressin and 86% in the group treated with alarm; the difference was not significant. During the first week of treatment the group given desmopressin was significantly dryer, and at the end of the study 10 of these patients relapsed compared with one patient in the group given the alarm. No serious side effects were observed. This study confirms the role of conditioning treatment as preferable in long term treatment of nocturnal enuresis. When this fails or when a safe drug with rapid effect is needed, however, desmopressin is a useful alternative.
AD
PMID
24
TI
Efficacy of desmopressin and enuresis alarm as first and second line treatment for primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis: prospective randomized crossover study.
AU
Kwak KW, Lee YS, Park KH, Baek M
SO
J Urol. 2010;184(6):2521. Epub 2010 Oct 18.
 
PURPOSE: We compared the efficacy of desmopressin and enuresis alarm as first and second line treatment options for monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 104 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis were randomly assigned to either desmopressin (54) or enuresis alarm (50) as first line treatment. Following 12 weeks of first line treatment children with a full response were evaluated for relapse 12 weeks after withdrawal of treatment. Children with partial or no response were switched to the alternative treatment and then evaluated after 12 weeks of crossover treatment. Relapse was defined as more than 1 episode of bedwetting monthly.
RESULTS: Following first line treatment 77.8% of the desmopressin group and 82% of the enuresis alarm group achieved a successful result, including full response in 37% and 50% of the groups, respectively (p=0.433). Of the children with a full response 50% in the desmopressin group and 12% in the enuresis alarm group experienced a relapse when treatment stopped (p=0.005). Following second line crossover treatment 71.4% of the enuresis alarm-desmopressin group and 67.8% of the desmopressin-enuresis alarm group achieved a successful result, including full response in 47.6% and 45.2% of the groups, respectively (p=0.961).
CONCLUSIONS: There was no difference between desmopressin and enuresis alarm during treatment for achieving dryness, but the chance of relapse after treatment stopped was higher following desmopressin. Switching to the alternative treatment following partial or no response provided an additional benefit.
AD
Department of Urology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Korea.
PMID
25
TI
Primary nocturnal enuresis: a comparison among observation, imipramine, desmopressin acetate and bed-wetting alarm systems.
AU
Monda JM, Husmann DA
SO
J Urol. 1995;154(2 Pt 2):745.
 
Patients with primary nocturnal enuresis were entered into 4 treatment groups: observation, imipramine, desmopressin acetate or alarm therapy. Patients were weaned from therapy 6 months after inclusion in the study and were evaluated for continence at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after beginning the study protocol. Of the 50 patients under observation 6% were continent at 6 months and 16% were continent within 12 months. Of 44 patients treated with imipramine 36% were continent at 6 months on medication; however, only 16% were continent at 12 months, off medication. Similarly, of the 88 patients treated with desmopressin acetate 68% were continent at 6 months but only 10% were continent at 12 months. Of the 79 patients treated with alarm therapy 63% were continent at 6 months and 56% were dry at 12 months. Although each form of therapy improved continence over observation alone (p<0.01), only the bed-wetting alarm system demonstrated persistent effectiveness (p<0.001).
AD
Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
PMID