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Medline ® Abstracts for References 63,67,69-74

of '化疗引起的脱发'

63
TI
Clinical observations of scalp cooling in patients receiving multidrug chemotherapy
AU
Knobf M, Kalm D, Mealia M
SO
Oncol Nurs Forum. 1989;16(suppl):200.
 
AD
67
TI
Presentation, impact and prevention of chemotherapy-induced hair loss: scalp cooling potentials and limitations.
AU
Breed W, van den Hurk C, Peerbooms M
SO
Expert Rev Dermatol. 2011;6:109.
 
AD
69
TI
The effectiveness of scalp cooling in preventing alopecia for patients receiving epirubicin and docetaxel.
AU
Macduff C, Mackenzie T, Hutcheon A, Melville L, Archibald H
SO
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2003;12(2):154.
 
The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of scalp cooling in preventing alopecia for patients with breast cancer who received the trial combination chemotherapy of Epirubicin and Docetaxel. Doubt remains about the general effectiveness of scalp cooling in preventing hair loss for patients receiving chemotherapy. There is very little information available about its specific effectiveness with combinations of Taxanes and Anthracycline drugs. Of the 40 patients who received this drug combination, 10 were included in a pilot study whereas the remaining 30 constituted the main study sample. A randomized controlled study was undertaken whereby the intervention group received scalp cooling via gel cool caps and the control group received no specific preventative intervention. Nurses assessed participants' hair loss using a modified version of the WHO scale at seven time points and also recorded hair loss photographically. Two independent experts rated the photographs using the same scale. Patients self-reported in relation to overall hair loss, hair condition, levels of emotional upset, negativity about appearance, hair re-growth and wig use. Significantly greater hair loss was apparent in the control group during most of the treatment period. However, the level of protection afforded by the cool caps was relatively poor with this chemotherapy combination. The marginal benefits of scalp cooling in this context must be clearly explained to patients.
AD
Centre for Nurse Practice Research and Development, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK. c.macduff@rgu.ac.uk
PMID
70
TI
Scalp hypothermia in the prevention of doxorubicin-induced hair loss.
AU
Giaccone G, Di Giulio F, Morandini MP, Calciati A
SO
Cancer Nurs. 1988;11(3):170.
 
AD
PMID
71
TI
Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia using an effective scalp cooling system.
AU
Katsimbri P, Bamias A, Pavlidis N
SO
Eur J Cancer. 2000;36(6):766.
 
Alopecia is a distressing side-effect of cancer treatment. Taxanes (TX), anthracyclines (ANR) and etoposide (ET) have been consistently associated with significant alopecia. We studied an effective scalp cooling system, the Penguin Cold Cap system, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in 70 patients receiving chemotherapy, including one of the following major alopecia-causing agents: Group A, TX-based regimes (without ANR); Group B, TX+ANR; Group C, ANR-based regimes (without TX); Group D, ET-based regimes. Protection from hair loss was achieved by maintaining scalp temperatures below 15 degrees C before, during and after chemotherapy by frequent changing of the caps. Assessment was carried out using a grading system from 0 to 4. Grades 0-2 were considered as satisfactory hair protection, whilst Grades 3-4 were considered failures. 57 patients were evaluable for assessment. An overall 81% protection was achieved. In groups C and D 11 of 12 patients (92%) had no alopecia, whilst 30 of 34 patients (88%) treated with taxanes had adequate hair protection. In Group B, 4 of 11 patients (36%) had adequate hair protection. The system was well tolerated and is a very effective method for protection from hair loss caused by TX, ANR and ET. Our results are comparable with and, in most cases, better than those reported in other studies using various alopecia preventive methods.
AD
Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
PMID
72
TI
Successful reduction of alopecia induced by anthracycline and taxane containing adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer - clinical evaluation of sensor-controlled scalp cooling.
AU
Friedrichs K, Carstensen MH
SO
Springerplus. 2014;3:500. Epub 2014 Sep 5.
 
BACKGROUND: Scalp cooling is a long known method to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia in cancer patients with solid tumors. Due to a progress in this method, a medical device enabling individual feedback-controlled temperature regulation was evaluated. Between June 2011 and December 2012, 83 breast cancer patients were included. Evaluation was focussed on the quantification of alopecia, satisfaction and side effects of the scalp cooling system in (neo-) adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Alopecia quantification was done by patient evaluation and experts rating.
FINDINGS: Based on patient hair loss evaluations, the mean overall success rate of scalp cooling (<50% hair loss) in (neo-) adjuvant chemotherapy was at 52.6%. 51.7% of patients in (neo-) adjuvant CT did not need head covers. In 51.7% of patients in (neo-) adjuvant chemotherapy hair regrowth occurred. Patient satisfaction rate was between VAS 70 and 80 (0-100, where 100 is completely satisfied).
CONCLUSION: The evaluation demonstrates that feedback-controlled scalp cooling provides a good chance for breast cancer patients to keep their hair even during (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapies, which are known to cause severe to complete alopecia without scalp cooling.
AD
Mammazentrum Hamburg at Jerusalem Hospital, Moorkamp 2-6, 20357 Hamburg, Germany.
PMID
73
TI
Efficacy of Scalp Cooling in Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy.
AU
Cigler T, Isseroff D, Fiederlein B, Schneider S, Chuang E, Vahdat L, Moore A
SO
Clin Breast Cancer. 2015;15(5):332. Epub 2015 Jan 26.
 
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is a distressing adverse effect of many chemotherapy agents. The TC (docetaxel [Taxotere]and cyclophosphamide) chemotherapy regimen is typically associated with complete alopecia. Scalp cooling with cold caps has been reported to minimize or prevent CIA. We conducted a prospective study to assess efficacy of scalp cooling in preventing CIA among women receiving adjuvant TC chemotherapy for breast cancer.
METHODS: Women at the Weill Cornell Breast Center who independently elected to use scalp cooling with cold caps during adjuvant TC chemotherapy were asked to participate. Degree of hair loss was assessed by a single practitioner using Dean's alopecia scale (grade 1/excellent [<25% hair loss], grade 2/good [25%-50% hair loss], grade 3/moderate [50%-75% hair loss], grade 4/poor [>75% hair loss]), by digital photographs, and by patient self-report of hair thinning or the need to wear a wig/head covering, or both. Assessments were made before each chemotherapy treatment and at follow-up visits between 3 weeks and 3 months after completion of chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Of 20 evaluable patients, 10% reported a need to wear a wig/head covering at the follow-up visit. Dean's alopecia score was excellent for 65% of patients, good for 25% of patients, and moderate or poor for 10% of patients. The majority of patients reported hair thinning after every chemotherapy cycle. No patient discontinued therapy because of an intolerance to cold caps.
CONCLUSION: Scalp cooling with cold caps appears to be effective in preventing CIA among the majority of women undergoing treatment with TC chemotherapy.
AD
Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY. Electronic address: tec9002@med.cornell.edu.
PMID
74
 
 
Rugo HS, Klein, P, Melin SA, et al. Clinical performance of the DigniCap system, a scalp hypothermia system, in preventing chemotherapy-induced alopecia (abstract). J Clin Oncol 33, 2015 (suppl; abst 9518). Abstract available online at http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/content/149240-156 (Accessed on October 05, 2015).
 
no abstract available