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Medline ® Abstracts for References 47,53

of '化疗引起的脱发'

47
TI
Permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia: case report and review of the literature.
AU
Tallon B, Blanchard E, Goldberg LJ
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010;63(2):333. Epub 2010 May 14.
 
Reversible alopecia following chemotherapy is well recognized and typically not evaluated by dermatologists. However, there are an increasing number of reports of permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, typically following high-dose chemotherapy and subsequent bone marrow transplantation. We describe an unusual case of permanent alopecia in a patient who received adjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma, and not a conditioning regimen before bone marrow transplantation. A unique histologic finding of replacement of anagen hair follicles by linear columns of basaloid epithelium is reported. We review the clinical and histologic findings of permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia and speculate on its pathogenesis.
AD
Dermatopathology Section, Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. bentallon@gmail.com
PMID
53
TI
Factors influencing the effectiveness of scalp cooling in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AU
Komen MM, Smorenburg CH, van den Hurk CJ, Nortier JW
SO
Oncologist. 2013;18(7):885-91. Epub 2013 May 6.
 
The success of scalp cooling in preventing or reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is highly variable between patients and chemotherapy regimens. The outcome of hair preservation is often unpredictable and depends on various factors. Methods. We performed a structured search of literature published from 1970 to February 2012 for articles that reported on factors influencing the effectiveness of scalp cooling to prevent CIA in patients with cancer. Results. The literature search identified 192 reports, of which 32 studies were considered relevant. Randomized studies on scalp cooling are scarce and there is little information on the determinants of the result. The effectiveness of scalp cooling for hair preservation depends on dose and type of chemotherapy, with less favorable results at higher doses. Temperature seems to be an important determinant. Various studies suggest that a subcutaneous scalp temperature less than 22°C is required for hair preservation. Conclusions. The effectiveness of scalp cooling for hair preservation varies by chemotherapy type and dose, and probably by the degree and duration of cooling.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Alkmaar, The Netherlands;
PMID