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Medline ® Abstracts for References 24-29

of '化疗引起的脱发'

24
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Follicular miniaturization in female pattern hair loss: clinicopathological correlations.
AU
Messenger AG, Sinclair R
SO
Br J Dermatol. 2006 Nov;155(5):926-30.
 
BACKGROUND: The pathology of female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is characterized by an increase in the proportion of vellus follicles, manifest as a low terminal/vellus ratio. This is conventionally thought to be due to a progressive miniaturization of terminal hair follicles. There is also a prolongation of the latent period of the hair cycle (kenogen) in both male pattern hair loss and FPHL and follicles in kenogen may be difficult to classify histologically. Therefore, a low terminal/vellus ratio could be due to a preferential increase in the number of terminal follicles in kenogen rather than to a true increase in the number of vellus follicles.
OBJECTIVES: To establish whether there is an increase in the absolute number of vellus follicles during the progression of FPHL, indicating a process of follicular miniaturization.
METHODS: We studied 42 women complaining of hair loss. The severity of the hair loss was graded clinically on a five-point scale from 1 (no obvious hair loss) to 5 (severe hair loss). Three 4-mm punch biopsies were taken from the frontal scalp of each patient, sectioned horizontally and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Two levels were studied on each biopsy: through the mid-infundibular region and through the mid-isthmus. The following were counted: total follicles, terminal follicles, vellus follicles, anagen and telogen/catagen follicles. The results from the three biopsies from each subject were averaged and statistical evaluations performed on the mean values.
RESULTS: There was a progressive decline in mean total follicle count with increasing grade of hair loss (grade 1, 317 cm(-2); grade 5, 243 cm(-2)) and a more pronounced reduction in terminal follicle counts (grade 1, 263 cm(-2); grade 5, 96 cm(-2)). The absolute number of vellus follicles increased from 33 cm(-2) (grade 1) to 71 cm(-2) (grade 4), declining to 51 cm(-2) at grade 5. The terminal/vellus ratio fell from 12.8 (grade 1) to 2.3 (grade 4) and remained at this level thereafter. The proportion of follicles in telogen increased from 13.7% (grade 1) to 31.4% (grade 5).
CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that there is an increase in vellus follicle numbers with increasing severity of hair loss in women with FPHL, suggesting that terminal follicles do indeed miniaturize. It is possible that there is also an increase in the number of follicles in a latent stage of telogen but this was difficult to assess from our data. The fall in total follicle counts with stabilizing of the terminal/vellus ratio in severe hair loss suggests that miniaturization does not stop with a vellus follicle but progresses to follicular deletion.
AD
Department of Dermatology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK. a.g.messenger@sheffield.ac.uk
PMID
25
TI
Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients - results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry.
AU
van den Hurk CJ, Peerbooms M, van de Poll-Franse LV, Nortier JW, Coebergh JW, Breed WP
SO
Acta Oncol. 2012 Apr;51(4):497-504. Epub 2012 Feb 6.
 
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a frequently occurring side effect of cancer treatment with a high psychological impact which can be prevented by scalp cooling. With this multi-centre patient series we estimated the results of scalp cooling for currently used chemotherapies to provide patient information and we identified characteristics associated with the results.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry collected data on scalp-cooled patients in 28 Dutch hospitals. Nurses and patients completed questionnaires on patients, chemotherapy and scalp cooling characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associated characteristics of the scalp cooling result.
RESULTS: Overall, 50% of the 1411 scalp-cooled patients did not wear a head cover during their last chemotherapy session. Patients were satisfied with the results in 8% of cases after TAC chemotherapy and up to 95% after paclitaxel treatment. Besides type of chemotherapy, higher dose and shorterinfusion time, older age, female gender and non-West-European type of hair significantly increased the proportion head cover use. Hair length, quantity, chemical manipulation (dyeing, waving, colouring), wetting hair before scalp cooling, and treatment with chemotherapy ever before did not influence the degree of head covering among patients.
CONCLUSIONS: Scalp cooling results as recorded in this open patient registry were positive for most regimens, justifying it's use by all eligible patients, except for those needing TAC. Lengthening infusion time may improve the results.
AD
Eindhoven Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Research Department, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. c.vd.hurk@ikz.nl
PMID
26
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Sensor-controlled scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in female cancer patients.
AU
Fehr MK, Welter J, Sell W, Jung R, Felberbaum R
SO
Curr Oncol. 2016;23(6):e576.
 
BACKGROUND: Scalp cooling has been used since the 1970s to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia, one of the most common and psychologically troubling side effects of chemotherapy. Currently available scalp cooling systems demonstrate varying results in terms of effectiveness and tolerability.
METHODS: For the present prospective study, 55 women receiving neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of a sensor-controlled scalp cooling system (DigniCap: Sysmex Europe GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast or gynecologic cancer patients receiving 1 of 7 regimens. Clinical assessments, satisfaction questionnaires, and alopecia evaluations [World Health Organization (who) grading for toxicity]were completed at baseline, at each cycle, and at completion of chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Of the 55 patients, 78% underwent scalp cooling until completion of chemotherapy. In multivariate analysis, younger women and those receiving paclitaxel weekly or paclitaxel-carboplatin experienced less alopecia. The compound successful outcome ("no head covering" plus "who grade 0/1") was observed in all patients 50 years of age and younger receiving 4 cycles of docetaxel-cyclophosphamide or 6 cycles of paclitaxel-carboplatin. Conversely, alopecia was experienced by all women receiving triplet polychemotherapy (6 cycles of docetaxel-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide). For women receiving sequential polychemotherapy regimens (3 cycles of fluorouracil-epirubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel or 4 cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel), the subgroup 50 years of age and younger experienced a 43% success rate compared with a 10% rate for the subgroup pf older women receiving the same regimens.
CONCLUSIONS: The ability of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia varies with the chemotherapy regimen and the age of the patient. Use of a compound endpoint with subjective and objective measures provides insightful and practical information when counselling patients.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cantonal Hospital Frauenfeld, Switzerland.
PMID
27
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Erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp after gefitinib and radiotherapy for brain metastases secondary to lung cancer.
AU
Wu CY, Chen GS, Lan CC
SO
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2008;33(1):106. Epub 2007 Nov 3.
 
AD
PMID
28
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Scarring alopecia associated with use of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor gefitinib.
AU
Donovan JC, Ghazarian DM, Shaw JC
SO
Arch Dermatol. 2008;144(11):1524.
 
AD
PMID
29
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Expression of a dominant negative mutant of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking alterations in hair follicle development and skin structure.
AU
Murillas R, Larcher F, Conti CJ, Santos M, Ullrich A, Jorcano JL
SO
EMBO J. 1995;14(21):5216.
 
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key regulator of keratinocyte biology. However, the physiological role of EGFR in vivo has not been well established. To analyze the role of EGFR in skin, we have generated transgenic mice expressing an EGFR dominant negative mutant in the basal layer of epidermis and outer root sheath of hair follicles. Mice expressing the mutant receptor display short and waved pelage hair and curly whiskers during the first weeks of age, but subsequently pelage and vibrissa hairs become progressively sparser and atrophic. Eventually, most mice present severe alopecia. Histological examination of the skin of transgenic mice shows striking alterations in the development of hair follicles, which fail to enter into catagen stage. These alterations eventually lead to necrosis and disappearance of the follicles, accompanied by strong infiltration of the skin with inflammatory elements. The interfollicular epidermis of these mice shows marked hyperplasia, expression of hyperproliferation-associated keratin K6 and increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. EGFR function was inhibited in transgenic skin keratinocytes, since in vivo and in vitro autophosphorylation of EGFR was almost completely abolished on EGF stimulation. These results implicate EGFR in the control of hair cycle progression, and provide new information about its role in epidermal growth and differentiation.
AD
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid, Spain.
PMID