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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2-8

of '化疗引起的脱发'

2
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A practitioner's guide to cancer-related alopecia.
AU
Dorr VJ
SO
Semin Oncol. 1998;25(5):562.
 
Alopecia due to the side effects of the treatment of cancer is one of the most common and emotionally troublesome effects of cancer therapy. Preventive measures, primarily scalp hypothermia, can be effective in some cases, but the worry of subsequent scalp metastasis remains. Investigative studies in animals are hindered by a poor animal alopecia model. Several promising agents require translation into clinical practice. Until then, disguising the alopecia with wigs, hats, or turbans remains the mainstay of treatment.
AD
Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, University of Missouri, Columbia 65203, USA.
PMID
3
TI
Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: new developments.
AU
Hussein AM
SO
South Med J. 1993;86(5):489.
 
Alopecia (hair loss) is one of the most physically and psychologically distressing side effects of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Since its first recognition as a common outcome to most chemotherapeutic agents, only a few trials have been reported, using either a method to temporarily reduce the scalp blood flow (scalp tourniquet or hypothermia) or vitamin E, with undocumented and variable efficacy. The lack of progress in the treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia is in part due to the lack of a reproducible animal model. In the past 2 years, we reported on the following observations: (1) treatment of 8-day-old rats with vidarabine (ara-C), doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide consistently produced either total body alopecia (ara-C and cyclophosphamide) or alopecia confined to the head and proximal part of the back (doxorubicin); (2) Imuvert, a biologic response modifier derived from the bacterium Serratia marcescens, uniformly produced complete protection against alopecia induced by ara-C and doxorubicin but not that produced by cyclophosphamide; (3) the protective effect of Imuvert against chemotherapy-induced alopecia is mediated by a monocyte-mediated cytokine; and (4) this monocyte-derived cytokine is, possibly, interleukin-1. These observations constitute important progress in the understanding and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AD
William J. Harrington Center for Blood Diseases, University of Miami School of Medicine, Fla.
PMID
4
TI
Psychological sequelae and alopecia among women with cancer.
AU
McGarvey EL, Baum LD, Pinkerton RC, Rogers LM
SO
Cancer Pract. 2001;9(6):283.
 
PURPOSE: This article reviews the relevant literature on treatment-induced alopecia in women with cancer and describes the development of a computer-assisted intervention to reduce distress associated with this side effect.
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Alopecia has been cited as the most disturbing anticipated side effect by up to 58% of women preparing for chemotherapy, with 8% being at risk for avoiding treatment. Women with cancer who experience alopecia as a side effect, compared with women with cancer and no alopecia, report lower self-esteem, poorer body image, and lower quality of life. Although physicians' recommendations are the most influential factor on cancer treatment choice, body image and effects on sexuality are the next most influential factors. A study of a computer-imaging intervention, based on concepts related to guided imagery and anticipatory grief, has been launched in an effort to aid women in coping with anticipated treatment-related alopecia.
RESULTS: While we are still waiting for final data collection and analysis from the computer intervention study, the feedback thus far has been positive.
CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The intervention described here may prove to be effective in desensitizing women with cancer to hair loss and facilitating an adjustment to self-acceptance. As such, a higher quality of life during the difficult time of coping may be maintained. The development of a computer-imaging intervention offers an opportunity to integrate a standard psychosocial intervention, personalized for each patient, into the routine patient care in the oncology setting.
AD
PMID
5
TI
The impact of cancer and chemotherapy: perceptual similarities and differences between cancer patients, nurses and physicians.
AU
Mulders M, Vingerhoets A, Breed W
SO
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008;12(2):97.
 
BACKGROUND: An essential condition to provide optimal care to cancer patients is a thorough understanding of the worries and needs of these patients.
PURPOSE: To assess and compare perceptions about the impact of cancer and chemotherapy of health-care providers and patients.
METHODS: Breast cancer survivors (N=80), oncology nurses (N=41) and physicians (N=49) with oncology experience completed a psychophysical scaling method with items tapping both the physical and psychosocial effects of cancer and chemotherapy.
RESULTS: The following five issues ranked highest among patients: fear of metastases, fatigue, consciousness of one's own vulnerability, hair loss and nausea. Whereas there was a strong correspondence between the ratings of nurses and physicians, both groups grossly overestimated and underestimated various issues. For example, the effects on relationships with partners and children were greatly overestimated by nurses, while physicians underestimated hair loss the most.
CONCLUSIONS: There was a considerable discrepancy on various issues between perceptions of patients and medical professionals.
CLINICAL IMPLICATION: The observed lack of correspondence between patients and health-care providers may result in inappropriate provision of attention and health care. Methods have to be developed to assess easily the main needs and worries of individual patients, which is an essential condition to be able to provide optimal care.
AD
Department of Psychology and Health, Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90.153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands.
PMID
6
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Chemotherapy-induced alopecia and effects on quality of life among women with breast cancer: a literature review.
AU
Lemieux J, Maunsell E, Provencher L
SO
Psychooncology. 2008;17(4):317.
 
BACKGROUND: Alopecia is a common side effect of chemotherapies used in the treatment of breast cancer. The aim of this review is to describe the effects of alopecia on quality of life (QOL) in this population.
METHODS: We conducted a literature review using Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycInfo databases. We searched for studies on the effects of alopecia on various aspects of QOL in breast cancer patients including anxiety and distress, body image, sexuality, self-esteem, social functioning, global QOL and return to work outcomes.
RESULTS: A total of 38 articles were included in the review. Hair loss consistently ranked amongst the most troublesome side effects, was described as distressing, and may affect the body image.
CONCLUSIONS: We found very little quantitative data on other aspects of QOL. More research is needed to determine the presence and extent of negative effects on chemotherapy-induced alopecia on various aspects of QOL.
AD
Unitéde recherche en santédes populations, Centre hospitalier affiliéuniversitaire de Québec, Quebec, Que, Canada. julie.lemieux@uresp.ulaval.ca
PMID
7
TI
Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: psychosocial impact and therapeutic approaches.
AU
Hesketh PJ, Batchelor D, Golant M, Lyman GH, Rhodes N, Yardley D
SO
Support Care Cancer. 2004;12(8):543.
 
Despite advances in the treatment of many side effects associated with chemotherapy, alopecia remains an issue that is difficult to resolve. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is a condition that can have profound psychosocial and quality-of-life consequences, resulting in anxiety, depression, a negative body image, lowered self-esteem, and a reduced sense of well-being. Patients who fear CIA may sometimes select regimens with less favorable outcomes or may refuse treatment. When supporting patients with CIA, health care providers should use an individualized approach with a focus placed on the actual moment of hair loss. Education, support groups, and self-care strategies are important components of any management approach. No treatment modality for preventing CIA has been clearly shown to be effective. Recent evidence suggests that new scalp hypothermic regimens may be safe and effective. There remains a critical need for effective new approaches to this problem.
AD
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Caritas St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, 736 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA, USA. phesketh@massmed.org
PMID
8
TI
Impact of alopecia and scalp cooling on the well-being of breast cancer patients.
AU
van den Hurk CJ, Mols F, Vingerhoets AJ, Breed WP
SO
Psychooncology. 2010;19(7):701.
 
OBJECTIVE: Chemotherapy-induced alopecia, a common and distressing side effect of chemotherapy, may be prevented by scalp cooling, which reduces toxicity of cytostatics in hair root cells. This is the first study designed to assess the effect of scalp cooling on well-being.
METHODS: A prospective multi-centre study was performed in 13 hospitals. Breast cancer patients treated with (N=98) and without (N=168) scalp cooling completed questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC-QLQ-BR23, BIS, MBA, HADS) before chemotherapy, and three weeks and six months after the last chemotherapy cycle.
RESULTS: Scalp cooling was effective in 52% of the cases. Alopecia was considered among the most distressing problems at all three moments of measurement. A trend towards higher well-being was found in successfully scalp-cooled patients, as indicated by a general better health-related quality of life and better body image, whereas unsuccessfully scalp-cooled patients reported lowest well-being.
CONCLUSIONS: Scalp cooling contributes not only to the well-being of successfully scalp-cooled patients but also seems to cause additional distress when patients lose their hair despite scalp cooling. This might be related to disappointment due to alopecia despite scalp cooling or possibly to a general higher biological availability of cytostatics. We recommend additional support for patients when scalp cooling is not successful and to spend more effort to maximise the effectiveness of scalp cooling.
AD
Comprehensive Cancer Centre South (CCCS), Eindhoven Cancer Registry, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. research@ikz.nl
PMID