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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,3,55,60,61

of '化疗引起的脱发'

2
TI
A practitioner's guide to cancer-related alopecia.
AU
Dorr VJ
SO
Semin Oncol. 1998;25(5):562.
 
Alopecia due to the side effects of the treatment of cancer is one of the most common and emotionally troublesome effects of cancer therapy. Preventive measures, primarily scalp hypothermia, can be effective in some cases, but the worry of subsequent scalp metastasis remains. Investigative studies in animals are hindered by a poor animal alopecia model. Several promising agents require translation into clinical practice. Until then, disguising the alopecia with wigs, hats, or turbans remains the mainstay of treatment.
AD
Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, University of Missouri, Columbia 65203, USA.
PMID
3
TI
Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: new developments.
AU
Hussein AM
SO
South Med J. 1993;86(5):489.
 
Alopecia (hair loss) is one of the most physically and psychologically distressing side effects of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Since its first recognition as a common outcome to most chemotherapeutic agents, only a few trials have been reported, using either a method to temporarily reduce the scalp blood flow (scalp tourniquet or hypothermia) or vitamin E, with undocumented and variable efficacy. The lack of progress in the treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia is in part due to the lack of a reproducible animal model. In the past 2 years, we reported on the following observations: (1) treatment of 8-day-old rats with vidarabine (ara-C), doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide consistently produced either total body alopecia (ara-C and cyclophosphamide) or alopecia confined to the head and proximal part of the back (doxorubicin); (2) Imuvert, a biologic response modifier derived from the bacterium Serratia marcescens, uniformly produced complete protection against alopecia induced by ara-C and doxorubicin but not that produced by cyclophosphamide; (3) the protective effect of Imuvert against chemotherapy-induced alopecia is mediated by a monocyte-mediated cytokine; and (4) this monocyte-derived cytokine is, possibly, interleukin-1. These observations constitute important progress in the understanding and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AD
William J. Harrington Center for Blood Diseases, University of Miami School of Medicine, Fla.
PMID
55
TI
Efficacy of interventions for prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
AU
Shin H, Jo SJ, Kim DH, Kwon O, Myung SK
SO
Int J Cancer. 2015;136(5):E442.
 
Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is a highly distressing event for cancer patients, and hence, we here aimed to assess the efficacy of various interventions in the prevention of CIA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library, from June 20, 2013 through August 31, 2013. Two of the authors independently reviewed and selected clinical trials that reported the efficacy of any intervention for prevention of CIA compared with that of controls. Two authors extracted data independently on dichotomized outcome in terms of CIA occurrence. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidential intervals (CIs) were calculated for efficacy of CIA prevention by using random-effect or fixed-effect models. Out of 691 articles retrieved, a total of eight randomized controlled trials and nine controlled clinical trials involving 1,098 participants (616 interventions and 482 controls), were included in the final analyses. Scalp cooling, scalp compression, a combination of cooling and compression, topical minoxidil and Panicum miliaceum were used as interventions. The participants were mainly breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin- or epirubicin-containing chemotherapy. Scalp cooling, which is the most popular preventive method, significantly reduced the risk of CIA (RR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.32-0.45), whereas topical 2% minoxidil and other interventions did not significantly reduce the risk of CIA. No serious adverse effects associated with scalp cooling were reported. Our results suggest that scalp cooling can prevent CIA in patients receiving chemotherapy. However, the long-term safety of scalp cooling should be confirmed in further studies.
AD
Department of Dermatology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
PMID
60
TI
Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia: a review of the literature.
AU
Cline BW
SO
Cancer Nurs. 1984;7(3):221.
 
AD
PMID
61
TI
Presentation, impact and prevention of chemotherapy-induced hair loss: scalp cooling potentials and limitations.
AU
Breed W, van den Hurk C, Peerbooms M
SO
Expert Rev Dermatol. 2011;6:109.
 
AD