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Medline ® Abstracts for References 2,3,50,52,60,64,71

of '化疗引起的脱发'

2
TI
A practitioner's guide to cancer-related alopecia.
AU
Dorr VJ
SO
Semin Oncol. 1998;25(5):562.
 
Alopecia due to the side effects of the treatment of cancer is one of the most common and emotionally troublesome effects of cancer therapy. Preventive measures, primarily scalp hypothermia, can be effective in some cases, but the worry of subsequent scalp metastasis remains. Investigative studies in animals are hindered by a poor animal alopecia model. Several promising agents require translation into clinical practice. Until then, disguising the alopecia with wigs, hats, or turbans remains the mainstay of treatment.
AD
Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, University of Missouri, Columbia 65203, USA.
PMID
3
TI
Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: new developments.
AU
Hussein AM
SO
South Med J. 1993;86(5):489.
 
Alopecia (hair loss) is one of the most physically and psychologically distressing side effects of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Since its first recognition as a common outcome to most chemotherapeutic agents, only a few trials have been reported, using either a method to temporarily reduce the scalp blood flow (scalp tourniquet or hypothermia) or vitamin E, with undocumented and variable efficacy. The lack of progress in the treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia is in part due to the lack of a reproducible animal model. In the past 2 years, we reported on the following observations: (1) treatment of 8-day-old rats with vidarabine (ara-C), doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide consistently produced either total body alopecia (ara-C and cyclophosphamide) or alopecia confined to the head and proximal part of the back (doxorubicin); (2) Imuvert, a biologic response modifier derived from the bacterium Serratia marcescens, uniformly produced complete protection against alopecia induced by ara-C and doxorubicin but not that produced by cyclophosphamide; (3) the protective effect of Imuvert against chemotherapy-induced alopecia is mediated by a monocyte-mediated cytokine; and (4) this monocyte-derived cytokine is, possibly, interleukin-1. These observations constitute important progress in the understanding and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AD
William J. Harrington Center for Blood Diseases, University of Miami School of Medicine, Fla.
PMID
50
TI
Erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp-like eruption due to gefitinib: case report and review of the literature of alopecia associated with EGFR inhibitors.
AU
Toda N, Fujimoto N, Kato T, Fujii N, Nakanishi G, Nagao T, Tanaka T
SO
Dermatology. 2012;225(1):18.
 
A 69-year-old Japanese woman with multiple brain metastases secondary to non-small-cell lung cancer was treated with radiosurgery, and subsequently started oral gefitinib. Three years later, she presented with erythematous erosive alopecia with pustules on the scalp. A biopsy specimen showed a dense perifollicular infiltration composed of lymphocytes, neutrophils and abundant plasma cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from the lesions; however, treatment with antibiotics was not effective. We diagnosed an eruption resembling erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp. Although oral steroids did not improve the lesions, the pustules and erythema of the scalp rapidly improved within a few weeks after discontinuation of gefitinib. There have been only 11 case reports of alopecia associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors including our case. It is noteworthy that all cases were female, and most cases involved the parietal scalp. Moreover, the reduction or discontinuation of the EGFR inhibitors was needed in all cases with erythematous alopecia, which remained as scarring alopecia.
AD
Department of Dermatology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.
PMID
52
TI
Scarring alopecia associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib.
AU
Hepper DM, Wu P, Anadkat MJ
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 May;64(5):996-8.
 
AD
PMID
60
TI
Scalp cooling by cold air for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AU
Hillen HF, Breed WP, Botman CJ
SO
Neth J Med. 1990 Dec;37(5-6):231-5.
 
A new system is described for cooling the scalp with cold air in order to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Compressed air was cooled by means of a vortex tube built into a hair-drier cap. This system reduced the blood flow in the scalp to 35%, the surface temperature to 14.2 degrees C and the intradermal temperature at hair follicle level to 29.2 degrees C. The low temperature could be kept constant for at least one hour of cooling. By means of comparison, with cryogel packs the lowest epidermal temperature attained was 17.9 degrees C; moreover, once this was reached after 10 min, it rapidly rose again to 20.6 degrees C after 40 min. Forty-eight patients receiving cytostatic treatment for breast cancer were subjected to scalp cooling with the cold air system, starting 15 min before chemotherapy and lasting for 90 min. With the system set at an air temperature of -12 degrees C, the treatment was well tolerated. Of the 13 patients treated with 40 mg/m2 doxorubicin in combination with other cytostatics, 6 had hair loss less than WHO grade 3, in contrast to 1 of 4 patients given cryogel packs. However, patients treated with epirubicin at 75 mg/m2 all showed grade 3 hair loss in spite of air cooling. In view of the possibility of achieving and maintaining low scalp temperatures, the cold air system is to be preferred to cryogel packs. Whether better clinical results may be obtained with cooling for longer periods and/or to lower temperatures remains to be determined.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven.
PMID
64
TI
Failure of scalp hypothermia to prevent hair loss when cyclophosphamide is added to doxorubicin and vincristine.
AU
Middleton J, Franks D, Buchanan RB, Hall V, Smallwood J, Williams CJ
SO
Cancer Treat Rep. 1985;69(4):373.
 
Scalp hypothermia can prevent alopecia caused by low doses of doxorubicin alone or in simple combinations. The technique was used in 60 patients with breast cancer (24 receiving adjuvant therapy; 36 with advanced recurrent disease) receiving chemotherapy with iv doxorubicin (40 mg/m2) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m2) on Day 1 together with oral cyclophosphamide (200 mg/m2) on Days 2-5. The patients' desire to continue scalp hypothermia, reflecting their perception of benefit, and an objective assessment of hair retention were the study end points. The mean number of cycles of chemotherapy given (6.1 in patients receiving adjuvant therapy; 3.8 in those with advanced disease) exceeded the number of cycles with hypothermia (2.1 in patients receiving adjuvant therapy; 1.6 in those with advanced disease); no patients retained enough hair to encourage them to continue scalp hypothermia throughout chemotherapy. All patients were rated as having poor hair retention. Scalp hypothermia is ineffective when used with combinations of drugs, each causing alopecia, or with high doses of doxorubicin.
AD
PMID
71
TI
Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia using an effective scalp cooling system.
AU
Katsimbri P, Bamias A, Pavlidis N
SO
Eur J Cancer. 2000;36(6):766.
 
Alopecia is a distressing side-effect of cancer treatment. Taxanes (TX), anthracyclines (ANR) and etoposide (ET) have been consistently associated with significant alopecia. We studied an effective scalp cooling system, the Penguin Cold Cap system, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in 70 patients receiving chemotherapy, including one of the following major alopecia-causing agents: Group A, TX-based regimes (without ANR); Group B, TX+ANR; Group C, ANR-based regimes (without TX); Group D, ET-based regimes. Protection from hair loss was achieved by maintaining scalp temperatures below 15 degrees C before, during and after chemotherapy by frequent changing of the caps. Assessment was carried out using a grading system from 0 to 4. Grades 0-2 were considered as satisfactory hair protection, whilst Grades 3-4 were considered failures. 57 patients were evaluable for assessment. An overall 81% protection was achieved. In groups C and D 11 of 12 patients (92%) had no alopecia, whilst 30 of 34 patients (88%) treated with taxanes had adequate hair protection. In Group B, 4 of 11 patients (36%) had adequate hair protection. The system was well tolerated and is a very effective method for protection from hair loss caused by TX, ANR and ET. Our results are comparable with and, in most cases, better than those reported in other studies using various alopecia preventive methods.
AD
Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
PMID