UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 19,20,56-59

of '化疗引起的脱发'

19
TI
Permanent scalp alopecia related to breast cancer chemotherapy by sequential fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (FEC) and docetaxel: a prospective study of 20 patients.
AU
Kluger N, Jacot W, Frouin E, Rigau V, Poujol S, Dereure O, Guillot B, Romieu G, Bessis D
SO
Ann Oncol. 2012;23(11):2879. Epub 2012 May 9.
 
BACKGROUND: To analyze the clinical and histological features of permanent alopecia following a sequential fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (FEC) and docetaxel regimen for adjuvant breast cancer treatment.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women treated for breast cancer by a sequential adjuvant FEC and docetaxel regimen who developed permanent alopecia diagnosed between 2007 and 2011 were identified from the Department of Dermatology (Saint-Eloi Hospital, Montpellier, France) and the Department of Medical Oncology (CRLC Val d'Aurelle, Montpellier, France). Data were collected regarding demographics, type of cancer, delay of onset after chemotherapy, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), clinical description of the lesions, scalp biopsies, laboratory explorations investigating steroid hormonal, iron, zinc and thyroid status, therapy and outcome.
RESULTS: Twenty white Caucasian females were included. Hair loss presented with a moderate or intense androgenetic-like pattern of scalp alopecia. Biopsy specimen examinations were normal or displayed theandrogenetic-like pattern. Laboratory explorations ruled out iron or zinc deficiency and thyroid disorders and confirmed hormonal menopause without hyperandrogenism. The overall mean DLQI score reflected the distressing psychological consequences in the patients' lives. No spontaneous regrowth of the scalp hair was noted. Treatment including vitamins, minoxidil, psoralen and ultraviolet A therapy and spironolactone proved to be ineffective.
CONCLUSION: Permanent and severe alopecia is a newly reported complication of the FEC 100-docetaxel breast cancer regimen.
AD
University of Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
PMID
20
TI
Docetaxel and permanent alopecia.
AU
Tosti A, Palamaras I, Miteva M, Misciali C
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013;68(5):e151.
 
AD
PMID
56
TI
Scalp hypothermia in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.
AU
Vendelbo Johansen L
SO
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1985;24(2):113.
 
Alopecia is a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy, especially in combination with regimens with doxorubicin (Adriamycin). The effect of scalp hypothermia in connection with chemotherapy was evaluated as hair protection in 61 women with disseminated breast carcinoma, where earlier treatment routines had caused wig-requiring alopecia in nearly all patients. The cooling was performed with a gel-helmet (Hypotherm Gel-Kap). Of the 61 patients, 47 (77%) had no or slight, not wig-demanding hair loss, and 14 (23%) had severe (wig-demanding) hair loss. Seven patients had liver dysfunction; in 5 of these severe hair loss was observed; 2 had slight hair loss. Eighty-three per cent of the patients with normal liver function had no hair loss. Treatment tolerance was found to be good, and side effects were minimal. The method is found to be simple, effective and inexpensive, though still not technically optimal.
AD
PMID
57
TI
Scalp cooling has no place in the prevention of alopecia in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.
AU
Tollenaar RA, Liefers GJ, Repelaer van Driel OJ, van de Velde CJ
SO
Eur J Cancer. 1994;30A(10):1448.
 
35 patients were studied to determine the effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of alopecia caused by adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Scalp hypothermia was induced by the newly developed Theracool cooling machine. The chemotherapeutic regimen consisted of one perioperative course of doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (EORTC protocol 10854). Only 4 (11%) patients showed acceptable hair preservation (no or minor alopecia). 12 patients (34%) had moderate alopecia, all requiring a wig. 19 patients (54%) had complete alopecia. No scalp metastases were observed after scalp cooling. These results and a review of the literature suggest that scalp hypothermia to prevent alopecia may only be effective in a cytotoxic regimen containing an anthracycline as the sole alopecia-inducing agent. With current adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, in which a combination of cyclophosphamide and an anthracycline is often used, there is no place for scalp hypothermia.
AD
Department of Surgery, University Hospital Leiden, The Netherlands.
PMID
58
TI
Adriamycin alopecia prevented by cold air scalp cooling.
AU
Symonds RP, McCormick CV, Maxted KJ
SO
Am J Clin Oncol. 1986;9(5):454.
 
Preliminary studies are reported on the effectiveness of cold air scalp cooling to prevent alopecia in patients receiving Adriamycin. Cold air produced in a novel way using a vortex refrigeration tube was applied to the scalp for 15 min before and 30 min after the administration of Adriamycin and other cytotoxic agents. Sixteen of 26 patients had no hair loss, four had slight hair loss, and six required a wig. Two subgroups fared particularly well. Four of four patients treated with ABVD for Hodgkin's disease and nine of 13 treated with Adriamycin (40 mg/m2) and vincristine (2 mg) for breast cancer had no hair loss.
AD
PMID
59
TI
Prevention of doxorubicin-induced alopedia by scalp hypothermia: relation to degree of cooling.
AU
Gregory RP, Cooke T, Middleton J, Buchanan RB, Williams CJ
SO
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982 Jun;284(6330):1674.
 
AD
PMID