Find Print
0 Find synonyms

Find synonyms Find exact match

What's new in palliative care
UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate®
The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc.
What's new in palliative care
All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete.
Literature review current through: Feb 2017. | This topic last updated: Mar 21, 2017.

The following represent additions to UpToDate from the past six months that were considered by the editors and authors to be of particular interest. The most recent What's New entries are at the top of each subsection.

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF PALLIATIVE CARE

Early initiation of palliative care and survival (February 2017)

When initiated early in the disease course, palliative care improves clinical and quality of care outcomes; randomized trials in patients with cancer or advanced lung disease also report a survival advantage, although more diverse palliative care populations have not been studied. A meta-analysis of seven randomized trials involving 2184 patients concluded that there was no association between early initiation of palliative care and overall survival [1]. Previous reports of a possible survival advantage may have reflected bias in patient selection; only one of the seven trials was rated as having a low risk of bias. (See "Benefits, services, and models of subspecialty palliative care", section on 'Rationale for palliative care'.)

Palliative care during hematopoietic cell transplantation (February 2017)

For patients with serious life-threatening illness, comprehensive palliative care can be successfully integrated with disease-modifying treatment. The benefits of delivering palliative care alongside potentially curative treatment were shown in a randomized trial of inpatient palliative care consultation versus usual transplant care in 160 adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation [2]. At two weeks posttransplant, the increase in depression, anxiety, and overall symptom burden was less in the intervention group, and the decrease in quality of life (QOL) was also smaller. Depression and QOL benefits persisted at three months. (See "Benefits, services, and models of subspecialty palliative care", section on 'Rationale for palliative care'.)

ASCO recommendations on palliative care in patients with advanced cancer (November 2016)

In response to increasing evidence from randomized trials that early palliative care offers benefits in terms of quality of life, mood, end-of-life care, and possibly even survival, an updated provisional clinical opinion from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) now recommends integrating dedicated palliative care services into the care of inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment [3]. Essential components of palliative care may include symptom, distress, and functional status management; clarification of treatment goals; assistance with medical decision making; coordination with other care providers; and assessment and support of coping needs. (See "Benefits, services, and models of subspecialty palliative care", section on 'Rationale for palliative care'.)

SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT

Telotristat for refractory carcinoid syndrome diarrhea (March 2017)

Telotristat inhibits the production of serotonin by carcinoid tumors and reduces the frequency of carcinoid syndrome diarrhea. The randomized TELESTAR trial compared two doses of oral telotristat (250 mg and 500 mg, each taken three times daily) against placebo in 135 patients who had uncontrolled symptoms from carcinoid syndrome despite treatment with a somatostatin analog [4]. Treatment with telotristat at either dose was associated with a reduction in bowel movement frequency compared with placebo, and the drug was well tolerated. Based upon these results, telotristat has been approved in the United States, in combination with somatostatin analog therapy, for the treatment of adults with diarrhea related to carcinoid syndrome that is inadequately controlled by somatostatin analog therapy alone [5]. The recommended dose is 250 mg three times daily [6]. (See "Treatment of the carcinoid syndrome", section on 'Telotristat'.)

Antipsychotics for delirium in terminally ill patients (January 2017)

The benefit of antipsychotics for management of delirium in terminally ill patients has been called into question by a randomized trial in which 247 inpatients of a hospice or palliative care service with mild to moderately severe delirium were assigned to oral risperidone, haloperidol, or placebo every 12 hours for 72 hours [7]. All patients received individualized supportive care. Patients who received antipsychotics had more severe delirium, worse delirium-associated distress scores, more use of midazolam, more extrapyramidal effects, and worse short-term survival. In our view, this study does not justify abandoning the use of antipsychotics for severely agitated delirious patients but points to the importance of reversing precipitating causes, providing best supportive care for symptomatic distress associated with delirium, and the need for additional research on the use of antipsychotics. (See "Overview of managing common non-pain symptoms in palliative care", section on 'Treatment'.)

Dosing interval for zoledronic acid in patients with bone metastases (January 2017)

For patients with bone metastases from a solid tumor, the approved dose and schedule of administration for zoledronic acid to reduce the frequency of skeletal-related events (SREs) is 4 mg every three to four weeks. Less frequent dosing is supported by data from CALGB (Alliance) trial 70604, which randomly assigned 1822 patients with bone metastases from breast or prostate cancer or multiple myeloma to the same dose of zoledronic acid every 4 or every 12 weeks for two years, starting with the first dose. There was no difference in the proportion of patients who developed at least one SRE (29.5 versus 28.6 percent) [8]. There are now sufficient data in breast and prostate cancer to support dosing of zoledronic acid every 12 rather than every 4 weeks, and we suggest this approach for most patients. We still prefer every-four-week dosing, at least initially, for patients who have extensive or highly symptomatic bone metastases. (See "Osteoclast inhibitors for patients with bone metastases from breast, prostate, and other solid tumors", section on 'Dosing interval'.)

Updated MASCC/ESMO guidelines for nausea and emesis related to cancer treatment (October 2016)

Updated guidelines for prevention and management of cancer therapy-associated nausea and vomiting are available from the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and the European Society of Medical Oncology (table 1), the consensus panel also provides guidance on the use of prophylactic antiemetics in patients undergoing radiation therapy. (See "Prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults", section on 'Recommendations for specific groups'.)

SELECTED END-STAGE CONDITIONS

Decision aids for advance care planning in dementia (February 2017)

Structured interventions to improve advance care planning among families of patients with advanced dementia have not been well studied. In a cluster randomized trial, use of a video decision aid and structured family meeting resulted in better communication about end of life care, greater use of medical orders defining scope of treatment, and fewer hospital transfers compared with a control intervention (informational video and usual care plan meeting) [10]. Audiovisual decision aids and structured meetings may thus be effective components of multidimensional decision-making support for families of patients with advanced dementia. (See "Palliative care of patients with advanced dementia", section on 'Advance care planning'.)

Potential interaction between high-dose methotrexate and levetiracetam (November 2016)

Levetiracetam is sometimes used for prophylaxis and treatment of seizures in patients undergoing high-dose methotrexate (MTX) treatment for brain or other central nervous system (CNS) cancers, including lymphomas. Health Canada has issued a safety review describing a potential interaction between the two drugs, noting 13 reports received by the levetiracetam manufacturer and concluding that concurrent use can lead to significantly elevated levels of MTX and increased risk of toxicity [11]. The labeling is being revised to recommend careful MTX blood level monitoring. Additional details are available from Lexi-Interact, the drug interactions tool included within UpToDate. (See "Therapeutic use and toxicity of high-dose methotrexate", section on 'Coadministered drugs that may interfere with excretion'.)

Proton pump inhibitors may diminish capecitabine efficacy (October 2016)

Two recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitors diminish the effectiveness of capecitabine in the treatment of colorectal and gastroesophageal cancer [12,13]. It is hypothesized that higher gastric pH levels may inhibit dissolution and absorption of capecitabine. Patients who are receiving a capecitabine-containing regimen for adjuvant treatment of colon cancer or other malignancies should, when possible, avoid taking concurrent proton pump inhibitors. (See "Adjuvant therapy for resected stage III (node-positive) colon cancer", section on 'Capecitabine'.)

Use of UpToDate is subject to the Subscription and License Agreement.

REFERENCES

  1. Kavalieratos D, Corbelli J, Zhang D, et al. Association Between Palliative Care and Patient and Caregiver Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA 2016; 316:2104.
  2. El-Jawahri A, LeBlanc T, VanDusen H, et al. Effect of Inpatient Palliative Care on Quality of Life 2 Weeks After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA 2016; 316:2094.
  3. Ferrell BR, Temel JS, Tenin J. Integration of palliative care. J Clin Oncol 2016.
  4. Kulke MH, Hörsch D, Caplin ME, et al. Telotristat Ethyl, a Tryptophan Hydroxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Carcinoid Syndrome. J Clin Oncol 2017; 35:14.
  5. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm544035.htm (Accessed on March 03, 2017).
  6. http://www.xermelo.com/Media/Default/pdfs/Product_Info_telotristat_etiprate.pdf (Accessed on March 03, 2017).
  7. Agar MR, Lawlor PG, Quinn S, et al. Efficacy of Oral Risperidone, Haloperidol, or Placebo for Symptoms of Delirium Among Patients in Palliative Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med 2017; 177:34.
  8. Himelstein AL, Foster JC, Khatcheressian JL, et al. Effect of Longer-Interval vs Standard Dosing of Zoledronic Acid on Skeletal Events in Patients With Bone Metastases: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA 2017; 317:48.
  9. Roila F, Molassiotis A, Herrstedt J, et al. 2016 MASCC and ESMO guideline update for the prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and of nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer patients. Ann Oncol 2016; 27:v119.
  10. Hanson LC, Zimmerman S, Song MK, et al. Effect of the Goals of Care Intervention for Advanced Dementia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med 2017; 177:24.
  11. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/medeff/reviews-examens/levetiracetam-eng.php (Accessed on October 28, 2016).
  12. Chu MP, Hecht JR, Slamon D, et al. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors and Capecitabine Efficacy in Advanced Gastroesophageal Cancer: Secondary Analysis of the TRIO-013/LOGiC Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Oncol 2016.
  13. Sun J, Ilich AI, Kim CA, et al. Concomitant Administration of Proton Pump Inhibitors and Capecitabine is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Early Stage Colorectal Cancer Patients. Clin Colorectal Cancer 2016; 15:257.
Topic 95113 Version 7089.0

All topics are updated as new information becomes available. Our peer review process typically takes one to six weeks depending on the issue.