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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-6

of 'Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy'

1
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Transvaginal evisceration after hysterectomy: is vaginal cuff closure associated with a reduced risk?
AU
Iaco PD, Ceccaroni M, Alboni C, Roset B, Sansovini M, D'Alessandro L, Pignotti E, Aloysio DD
SO
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2006;125(1):134.
 
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the overall incidence of transvaginal evisceration following hysterectomy and to assess the risk associated with indication, route of surgery, age and vaginal cuff closure technique.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A database was used to identify all patients undergoing hysterectomy from 1995 to 2001 at our institution and all the patients admitted for vaginal evisceration during the same period. Each vaginal evisceration was analyzed for time of onset, trigger event, presenting symptoms, details of prolapsed organs and type of repair surgery.
RESULTS: Of the 3593 patients enrolled in the study, 63.5% underwent abdominal hysterectomy, 33.0% vaginal hysterectomy, and 3.5% laparoscopic hysterectomy. Ten patients (0.28%) presented to the emergency room with vaginal evisceration. No statistical differences in evisceration rates were seen according to the route of surgery. No differences were found between the 1440 patients who had closure of the vaginal cuff and the 2153 who had an unclosed cuff closure technique.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that, in young patients, sexual intercourse is to be considered the main trigger event before the complete healing of the vaginal cuff while, in elderly patients, the evisceration is a spontaneous event. Uterine prolapse was not associated with a higher rate and the route of surgery or vaginal cuff closure technique did not influence the dehiscence rate.
AD
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, via Massarenti 13, 40138 Bologna, Italy.
PMID
2
TI
Vaginal cuff dehiscence after different modes of hysterectomy.
AU
Hur HC, Donnellan N, Mansuria S, Barber RE, Guido R, Lee T
SO
Obstet Gynecol. 2011;118(4):794.
 
OBJECTIVE: To update the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after different modes of hysterectomy and to describe surgical and patient characteristics of dehiscence complications.
METHODS: This was an observational cohort study at a large academic hospital. All women who underwent hysterectomy and dehiscence repair between January 2006 and December 2009 were identified. Data from this study period were analyzed separately and in combination with our preliminary study (January 2000 to December 2005) for a 10-year analysis (January 2000 to December 2009). The primary outcome was incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared with abdominal, vaginal, and laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH).
RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2009, the overall incidence of dehiscence was 0.39% (95% confidence interval [CI]0.21-0.56). The incidence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy was 0.75% (95% CI 0.09-1.4), which was the highest among all modes of hysterectomy (LAVH was 0.46% [95% CI 0.0-1.10]; total abdominal hysterectomy was 0.38% [95% CI 0.16-0.61]; and total vaginal hysterectomy was 0.11%, [95% CI 0.0-0.32]). This incidence was appreciably lower than previously reported (4.93% in 2007 publication, 2.76% readjusted calculation). The 10-year cumulative incidence of dehiscence after all modes of hysterectomy was 0.24% (95% CI 0.15-0.33) and 1.35% (95% CI 0.72-2.3) among total laparoscopic hysterectomies. During the 10-year study period, total laparoscopic hysterectomy-related dehiscence was significantly increased compared with other modes of hysterectomy, with a risk ratio of dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy of 9.1 (95% CI 4.1-20.3) compared with total abdominal hysterectomy, risk ratio of 17.2 (95% CI 3.9-75.9) compared with total vaginal hysterectomy, and risk ratio of 4.9 (95% CI 1.1-21.5) compared with LAVH.
CONCLUSION: Our updated 1.35% incidence of dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy is much lower than previously reported.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. hhur@bidmc.harvard.edu
PMID
3
TI
Vaginal cuff dehiscence in a series of 12,398 hysterectomies: effect of different types of colpotomy and vaginal closure.
AU
Uccella S, Ceccaroni M, Cromi A, Malzoni M, Berretta R, De Iaco P, Roviglione G, Bogani G, Minelli L, Ghezzi F
SO
Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Sep;120(3):516-23.
 
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence after different routes of hysterectomy and methods of cuff closure.
METHODS: A multi-institutional analysis of 12,398 patients who underwent hysterectomy for both benign and malignant disease between 1994 and 2008 was performed. We analyzed how different routes of hysterectomy and approaches to cuff suture may influence the risk of development of vaginal dehiscence.
RESULTS: Women who had total laparoscopic (n=3,573), abdominal (n=4,291), and vaginal (n=4,534) hysterectomies experienced 23 (0.64%), 9 (0.2%), and 6 (0.13%) cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence, respectively. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy was associated with a higher incidence of cuff separations, compared with abdominal hysterectomy (0.64% compared with 0.21%, P=.003) and vaginal hysterectomy (0.64% compared with 0.13%, P<.001). Within the endoscopic group, patients who underwent vaginal closure with laparoscopic knots had a higher rate of cuff dehiscence than patients who had suture with transvaginal knots (20 of 2,332 [0.86%]compared with 3 of 1,241 [0.24%], P=.028). When vaginal suture was performed transvaginally, no statistical difference in vaginal cuff dehiscence rate was observed compared with both abdominal hysterectomy (0.24% compared with 0.21%, P=.83) and vaginal hysterectomy (0.24% compared with 0.13%, P=.38). Use of monopolar energy at the time of colpotomy and reducing the power of monopolar energy from 60 watts to 50 watts when colpotomy was performed at the end of total laparoscopic hysterectomy did not alter the rate of cuff separations.
CONCLUSION: Transvaginal suturing appears to reduce the risk of vaginal dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Insubria, Del Ponte Hospital, Varese, Italy. stefucc@libero.it
PMID
4
TI
Vaginal cuff dehiscence: risk factors and associated morbidities.
AU
Fuchs Weizman N, Einarsson JI, Wang KC, Vitonis AF, Cohen SL
SO
JSLS. 2015 Apr-Jun;19(2)
 
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether the route and surgical technique by which hysterectomy is performed influence the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of total hysterectomy cases performed at Brigham and Woman's Hospital or Faulkner Hospital during 2009 through 2011.
RESULTS: During the study period, 2382 total hysterectomies were performed; 23 of these (0.96%) were diagnosed with cuff dehiscence, and 4 women had recurrent dehiscence. Both laparoscopic (odds ratio, 23.4; P = .007) and robotic (odds ratio, 73; P = .0006) hysterectomies were associated with increased odds of cuff dehiscence in a multivariate regression analysis. The type of energy used during colpotomy, mode of closure (hand sewn, laparoscopic suturing, or suturing assisted by a device), and suture material did not differ significantly between groups; however, continuous suturing of the cuff was a protective factor (odds ratio, 0.24; P = .03). Women with dehiscence had more extensive procedures, as well as an increased incidence of additional major postoperative complications (17.4% vs 3%, P = .004).
CONCLUSION: The rate of cuff dehiscence in our cohort correlates with the current literature. This study suggests that the risk of dehiscence is influenced mainly by the scope and complexity of the surgical procedure. It seems that different colpotomy techniques do not influence the rate of cuff dehiscence; however, continuous suturing of the cuff may be superior to interrupted suturing.
AD
Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
PMID
5
TI
Vaginal cuff dehiscence and evisceration: a review of the literature.
AU
Hur HC, Lightfoot M, McMillin MG, Kho KA
SO
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2016;28(4):297.
 
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Vaginal cuff dehiscence and evisceration are rare but potentially serious complications of hysterectomy. In this article, we review the incidence, risk factors, management, and preventive measures for dehiscence based on available literature.
RECENT FINDINGS: Identifying risk factors for dehiscence is challenging because studies lack comparison groups and most studies are largely underpowered to draw concrete conclusions.
SUMMARY: High-quality data on cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy are limited. Potentially modifiable risks that optimize vaginal wound healing, minimize vaginal cuff strain, and minimize cuff infection should be optimized.
AD
aDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts bDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA *Hye-Chun Hur and Michelle Lightfoot contributed equally to the writing of this article.
PMID
6
TI
Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy: a multicenter retrospective study.
AU
Ceccaroni M, Berretta R, Malzoni M, Scioscia M, Roviglione G, Spagnolo E, Rolla M, Farina A, Malzoni C, De Iaco P, Minelli L, Bovicelli L
SO
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2011;158(2):308. Epub 2011 Jul 1.
 
OBJECTIVE: This study estimates the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence resulting from different approaches to hysterectomy.
STUDY DESIGN: This multicentric study was carried out retrospectively. We retrospectively analyzed 8635 patients; 37% underwent abdominal hysterectomy, 31.2% vaginal hysterectomy, and 31.8% laparoscopic hysterectomy. All the hysterectomies were considered, vaginal evisceration was registered and analyzed for time of onset, trigger event, presenting symptoms, details of prolapsed organs and type of repair surgery. Continuous variables were compared using the one-way analysis of variance between groups as all data followed a Gaussian distribution, as confirmed by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Differences among subgroups were assessed using the Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test. Categorical variables were compared with two tailed Chi-square tests with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Pearson's linear correlation was used to verify linear relationships between the dehiscence interval and patient's age at surgery.
RESULTS: Thirty-four patients (0.39%) experienced vaginal evisceration. The laparoscopic route was associated with a significantly higher incidence of dehiscence (p<0.05). No differences were found between the 6027 patients (69.8%) who had closure of the vaginal cuff and the 2608 (30.2%) who had an unclosed cuff closure technique.
CONCLUSION: Vaginal evisceration after hysterectomy is a rare gynecological surgical complication. Sexual intercourse before the complete healing of the vaginal cuff is the main trigger event in young patients, while evisceration presents as a spontaneous event in elderly patients. Surgical repair can be performed either vaginally or laparoscopically with similar outcomes.
AD
Gynecologic Oncology Division, International School of Surgical Anatomy, Sacred Heart Hospital, Negrar, Verona, Italy.
PMID