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Medline ® Abstracts for References 3-5

of 'Unipolar depression in adults: Treatment with lithium'

3
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Evaluation of outcomes with citalopram for depression using measurement-based care in STAR*D: implications for clinical practice.
AU
Trivedi MH, Rush AJ, Wisniewski SR, Nierenberg AA, Warden D, Ritz L, Norquist G, Howland RH, Lebowitz B, McGrath PJ, Shores-Wilson K, Biggs MM, Balasubramani GK, Fava M, STAR*D Study Team
SO
Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163(1):28.
 
OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used to treat depression, but the rates, timing, and baseline predictors of remission in "real world" patients are not established. The authors' primary objectives in this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of citalopram, an SSRI, using measurement-based care in actual practice, and to identify predictors of symptom remission in outpatients with major depressive disorder.
METHOD: This clinical study included outpatients with major depressive disorder who were treated in 23 psychiatric and 18 primary care "real world" settings. The patients received flexible doses of citalopram prescribed by clinicians for up to 14 weeks. The clinicians were assisted by a clinical research coordinator in the application of measurement-based care, which included the routine measurement of symptoms and side effects at each treatment visit and the use of a treatment manual that described when and how to modify medication doses based on these measures. Remission was defined as an exit score of<or=7 on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) (primary outcome) or a score of<or=5 on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Self-Report (QIDS-SR) (secondary outcome). Response was defined as a reduction of>or=50% in baseline QIDS-SR score.
RESULTS: Nearly 80% of the 2,876 outpatients in the analyzed sample had chronic or recurrent major depression; most also had a number of comorbid general medical and psychiatric conditions. The mean exit citalopram dose was 41.8 mg/day. Remission rates were 28% (HAM-D) and 33% (QIDS-SR). The response rate was 47% (QIDS-SR). Patients in primary and psychiatric care settings did not differ in remission or response rates. A substantial portion of participants who achieved either response or remission at study exit did so at or after 8 weeks of treatment. Participants who were Caucasian, female, employed, or had higher levels of education or income had higher HAM-D remission rates; longer index episodes, more concurrent psychiatric disorders (especially anxiety disorders or drug abuse), more general medical disorders, and lower baseline function and quality of life were associated with lower HAM-D remission rates.
CONCLUSIONS: The response and remission rates in this highly generalizable sample with substantial axis I and axis III comorbidity closely resemble those seen in 8-week efficacy trials. The systematic use of easily implemented measurement-based care procedures may have assisted in achieving these results.
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Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Exchange Park Express, American General Tower, 6363 Forest Park Rd., Suite 1300, Dallas, TX 75390-9119, USA. madhukar.trivedi@utsouthwestern.edu
PMID
4
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Remission rates following antidepressant therapy with bupropion or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a meta-analysis of original data from 7 randomized controlled trials.
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Thase ME, Haight BR, Richard N, Rockett CB, Mitton M, Modell JG, VanMeter S, Harriett AE, Wang Y
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J Clin Psychiatry. 2005;66(8):974.
 
BACKGROUND: Although it is widely believed that the various classes of antidepressants are equally effective, clinically meaningful differences may be obscured in individual studies because of a lack of statistical power. The present report describes a meta-analysis of original data from a complete set of studies comparing the norepinephrine/dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI) bupropion with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; sertraline, fluoxetine, or paroxetine).
METHOD: Individual patient data were pooled from a complete set of 7 randomized, double-blind studies comparing bupropion (N = 732) with SSRIs (fluoxetine, N = 339; sertraline, N = 343; paroxetine, N = 49) in outpatients with major depressive disorder (DSM-III-R or DSM-IV); 4 studies included placebo (N = 512). Response and remission rates were compared at week 8 or endpoint in both the intent-to-treat sample, using the last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) method to account for attrition, and the observed cases. Tolerability data, including incidence of sexual side effects, were also compared.
RESULTS: The LOCF response and remission rates for the bupropion (62% and 47%) and SSRI (63% and 47%) groups were similar; both active therapies were superior to placebo (51% and 36%; all comparisons, p<.001). The same pattern of results was demonstrated on the observed cases analyses. Although bupropion and SSRIs were generally well tolerated, SSRI therapy resulted in significantly higher rates of sexual side effects as compared to both bupropion and placebo. SSRIs were also associated with more somnolence and diarrhea, and bupropion was associated with more dry mouth.
CONCLUSION: Bupropion and the SSRIs were equivalently effective and, overall, both treatments were well tolerated. The principal difference between these treatments was that sexual dysfunction commonly complicated SSRI therapy, whereas treatment with bupropion caused no more sexual dysfunction than placebo.
AD
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-2593, USA. thaseme@upmc.edu
PMID
5
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Remission with mirtazapine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from 15 controlled trials of acute phase treatment of major depression.
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Thase ME, Nierenberg AA, Vrijland P, van Oers HJ, Schutte AJ, Simmons JH
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Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2010;25(4):189.
 
Antidepressants that enhance both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission may be more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for acute-phase therapy of major depressive disorder. Mirtazapine in particular has been suggested to have a faster onset of action than reuptake inhibitors. The aim of this study is to compare the remission rates and time to remission in patients with major depression taking either mirtazapine or an SSRI in an all-inclusive set of studies. Data were obtained from all eligible randomized controlled studies contrasting mirtazapine and SSRIs. Meta-analyses of remission rates and time to remission, together with a supportive analysis of mean change from baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scales-17 were performed, using individual patient data from 15 randomized controlled trials of mirtazapine (N = 1484) versus various SSRIs (N = 1487) across 6 weeks of double-blind therapy. Analyses were repeated for the eight studies that lasted at least 8 weeks. Remission rates for patients treated with mirtazapine were significantly higher when compared with those treated with an SSRI after 1 (3.4 vs. 1.6%, P = 0.0017), 2 (13.0 vs. 7.8%, P<0.0001), 4 (33.1 vs. 25.1%, P<0.0001), and 6 weeks (43.4 vs. 37.5%, P = 0.0006) of treatment. Mirtazapine-treated patients had a 74% higher likelihood of achieving remission during the first 2 weeks of therapy compared with patients treated with SSRIs. In conclusion, the findings indicate that mirtazapine may be a more rapidly effective antidepressant than SSRIs.
AD
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 3535 Market Street, Suite 670, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. thase@mail.med.upenn.edu
PMID