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Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors: Bacterial, viral, and fungal infections

Author
Kevin L Winthrop, MD, MPH
Section Editor
Kieren A Marr, MD
Deputy Editor
Anna R Thorner, MD

INTRODUCTION

Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha represent important treatment advances for a number of inflammatory conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, the seronegative spondyloarthropathies, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. TNF-alpha inhibitors offer a targeted strategy that contrasts with the nonspecific immunosuppressive agents traditionally used to treat most forms of systemic inflammation.

However, multiple adverse effects of TNF-alpha inhibition have been identified. These include:

Infections

Malignancies such as nonmelanoma skin cancers

Injection site reactions

                                   

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Wed May 27 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2015.
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