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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 155

of 'Treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma'

155
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VAD chemotherapy as remission induction for multiple myeloma.
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Anderson H, Scarffe JH, Ranson M, Young R, Wieringa GS, Morgenstern GR, Fitzsimmons L, Ryder D
SO
Br J Cancer. 1995;71(2):326.
 
A total of 142 patients with multiple myeloma received VAD as remission induction therapy. Seventy-five were previously untreated and 67 had relapsed (31) or refractory disease (36). Vincristine (total dose 1.6 mg) was infused with doxorubicin 36 mg m-2 by continuous ambulatory pump over 4 days. In addition, oral dexamethasone 40 mg day-1 was given for 4 days. Intermittent dexamethasone was only given to 19 patients. Courses were repeated every 21 days. The overall response rate was 84% [27% complete response (CR)]in previously untreated patients and 61% (3% CR) in patients with relapsed and refractory disease. The median survival was 36 months for untreated patients and 10 months for those who had received prior therapy. VAD was well tolerated; however, despite prophylaxis, 54% patients received antibiotics at some time during therapy and 37% had dyspepsia. Twenty-three patients subsequently received a transplant (eight allografts, eight marrow autografts and seven peripheral blood stem cell transplants). Eight have died-four in the allogeneic group and four in the autologous group. The overall median survival of transplanted patients has not yet been reached. VAD is an effective, out-patient therapy for inducing remission in multiple myeloma. Post-remission therapy needs to be optimised, but it is likely that the needs of previously untreated patients may be different from those with relapsed and refractory disease.
AD
Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
PMID