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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 137

of 'Treatment of relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia'

137
TI
Reconstitution of the T-cell repertoire following treatment with alemtuzumab (anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody) in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
AU
Rezvany MR, Tehrani MJ, Karlsson C, Lundin J, Rabbani H, Osterborg A, Mellstedt H
SO
Br J Haematol. 2006;135(4):475. Epub 2006 Sep 22.
 
In this pilot study, T-cell receptor B-variable (TCR-BV) gene usage in CD4 and CD8 T cells was assessed, by real-time polymerase chain reaction, as well as complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3)-length polymorphism, before and after therapy in five patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia who received alemtuzumab (anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody) as first-line therapy. A decline in expression of most BV family genes in both CD4 and CD8 T cells was observed after alemtuzumab treatment, which was followed by a gradual increase in most BV families during long-term follow-up. After treatment, CDR3-length polymorphism showed an even more restricted pattern in CD4 T cells compared with pretreatment, with a shift towards a monoclonal/oligoclonal pattern. The clonally restricted pattern was significantly reduced in CD4 (P<0.01) but not in CD8 T cells. This was followed by a gradual increase in the number of peaks within the CDR3 region of the different TCR-BV families, i.e. a polyclonal repertoire, during long-term follow-up. A restricted CDR3 pattern became even more restricted after treatment, but normalised during unmaintained follow-up. These results indicate that perturbations in the T-cell alterations following alemtuzumab are complex and include not only changes in CD4/CD8 T-cell numbers but also a highly restricted T-cell repertoire especially in CD4 T cells.
AD
Immune and Gene Therapy Laboratory, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Cancer Centre Karolinska (CCK), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
PMID