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Treatment of oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis

INTRODUCTION

Candida species can be associated with infections involving mucosal membranes, including the oropharynx and esophagus. The majority of these infections are related to Candida albicans. Oropharyngeal infection is often asymptomatic unless it is associated with lower tract disease, which is usually characterized by dysphagia or odynophagia.

The treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis or esophageal candidiasis will be discussed below. The clinical manifestations of oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis are discussed elsewhere. (See "Clinical manifestations of oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis" and "Evaluation of the HIV-infected patient with odynophagia and dysphagia" and "Overview of Candida infections".)

OROPHARYNGEAL CANDIDIASIS

The preferred therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis differs by patient population. The general duration of treatment is 7 to 14 days [1]. For any given drug, not all individuals with a clinical response will achieve a mycological response; however rates of relapse within one month tend to be lower when a mycological cure is obtained.

Considerations for treatment choice include drug effectiveness, severity of infection, ease of administration, anticipated adherence, gastric acidity (which may affect absorption), drug-drug interactions, and cost.

HIV-seronegative patients — The treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients without AIDS is usually accomplished with local antifungal lozenges or solutions [1-3].

                           

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Literature review current through: Nov 2014. | This topic last updated: Dec 10, 2013.
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