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Treatment of hypertension in patients with diabetes mellitus

INTRODUCTION AND PREVALENCE

Hypertension is a common problem in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but the time course in relation to the duration of diabetes is different [1-3]. Among those with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of hypertension rises from 5 percent at 10 years, to 33 percent at 20 years, and 70 percent at 40 years [1]. There is a close relation between the prevalence of hypertension and increasing albuminuria. The blood pressure typically begins to rise within the normal range at or within a few years after the onset of moderately increased albuminuria (the new term for what was previously called "microalbuminuria") [2] and increases progressively as the renal disease progresses. (See "Moderately increased albuminuria (microalbuminuria) in type 1 diabetes mellitus", section on 'Risk factors'.)

These features were illustrated in a study of 981 patients who had type 1 diabetes for five or more years [3]. Hypertension was present in 19 percent of patients with normoalbuminuria, 30 percent with moderately increased albuminuria, and 65 percent with severely increased albuminuria (the new term for what was previously called "macroalbuminuria") [2]. The incidence of hypertension eventually reaches 75 to 85 percent in patients with progressive diabetic nephropathy [4]. The risk of hypertension is highest in blacks, who are also at much greater risk for renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy. (See "Overview of diabetic nephropathy".)

The findings are different in patients with type 2 diabetes. In a series of over 3500 newly diagnosed patients, 39 percent were already hypertensive [5]. In approximately one-half of these patients, the elevation in blood pressure occurred before the onset of moderately increased albuminuria. Hypertension was strongly associated with obesity and, not surprisingly, the hypertensive patients were at increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. (See "Moderately increased albuminuria (microalbuminuria) in type 2 diabetes mellitus".)

This topic will review the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with diabetes mellitus and the three major treatment issues:

The evidence supporting benefit from the treatment of hypertension

                             

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Literature review current through: Nov 2014. | This topic last updated: Oct 14, 2014.
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