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Medline ® Abstracts for References 52-54

of 'Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults who require hospitalization'

52
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Proposed changes to management of lower respiratory tract infections in response to the Clostridium difficile epidemic.
AU
Chalmers JD, Al-Khairalla M, Short PM, Fardon TC, Winter JH
SO
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2010;65(4):608.
 
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a major healthcare problem associated with antibiotic use in hospitals. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the incidence of CDI in the UK and internationally. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are the leading indication for antibiotic prescription in hospitals and are therefore a critical battleground in the fight against inappropriate antibiotic use and healthcare-associated infections. This article reviews the evidence for interventions to reduce CDI in hospitalized patients with LRTIs. Reducing prescriptions of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones in favour of penicillin-based regimens and increased use of tetracyclines have been proposed. Expanding outpatient management of LRTIs and reducing length of hospital stay will limit patient exposure to the healthcare environment in which C. difficile is most easily acquired. Intravenous (iv) broad-spectrum antibiotics are often prescribed when narrower spectrum, oral antimicrobials would be equally effective and, in a proportion of patients, antibiotic therapy is used unnecessarily. Shorter antibiotic regimes may be as effective as prolonged therapy and reduce antibiotic-related complications. Early switch from iv to oral therapy allows simpler antibiotic regimens and facilitates early discharge from hospital. Simple improvements in the management of LRTIs have the potential to reduce the incidence of healthcare-associated infections.
AD
MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, Queens Medical Research Institute, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK. jamesdchalmers@googlemail.com
PMID
53
TI
Antiviral agents for the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza --- recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).
AU
Fiore AE, Fry A, Shay D, Gubareva L, Bresee JS, Uyeki TM, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
SO
MMWR Recomm Rep. 2011;60(1):1.
 
This report updates previous recommendations by CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of antiviral agents for the prevention and treatment of influenza (CDC. Prevention and control of influenza: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2008;57[No. RR-7]).This report contains information on treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza virus infection and provides a summary of the effectiveness and safety of antiviral treatment medications. Highlights include recommendations for use of 1) early antiviral treatment of suspected or confirmed influenza among persons with severe influenza (e.g., those who have severe, complicated, or progressive illness or who require hospitalization); 2) early antiviral treatment of suspected or confirmed influenza among persons at higher risk for influenza complications; and 3) either oseltamivir or zanamivir for persons with influenza caused by 2009 H1N1 virus, influenza A (H3N2) virus, or influenza B virus or when the influenza virus type or influenza A virus subtype is unknown; 4) antiviral medications among children aged<1 year; 5) local influenza testing and influenza surveillance data, when available, to help guide treatment decisions; and 6) consideration of antiviral treatment for outpatients with confirmed or suspected influenza who do not have known risk factors for severe illness, if treatment can be initiated within 48 hours of illness onset. Additional information is available from CDC's influenza website at http://www.cdc.gov/flu, including any updates or supplements to these recommendations that might be required during the 2010-11 influenza season. Health-care providers should be alert to announcements of recommendation updates and should check the CDC influenza website periodically for additional information. Recommendations related to the use of vaccines for the prevention of influenza during the 2010-11 influenza season have been published previously (CDC. Prevention and control of influenza with vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP], 2010. MMWR 2010;59[No. RR-8]).
AD
Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MS A-20, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
PMID
54
TI
What is the best antimicrobial treatment for severe community-acquired pneumonia (including the role of steroids and statins and other immunomodulatory agents).
AU
Sibila O, Restrepo MI, Anzueto A
SO
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2013 Mar;27(1):133-47. Epub 2012 Dec 21.
 
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the United States. The mortality rate due to severe CAP has shown little improvement over the past few years, with a rate as high as 50% mainly in patients admitted to intensive care units. Death and adverse outcomes from CAP result from a complex interplay between the pathogen and the host. Several therapies have been tested in patients with severe CAP in recent years. This article reviews recent data regarding different treatments including antimicrobials and adjunctive therapies in patients with severe CAP.
AD
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.
PMID