Medline ® Abstracts for References 45,46

of 'Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults who require hospitalization'

45
TI
Relative contribution of Panton-Valentine leukocidin to PMN plasma membrane permeability and lysis caused by USA300 and USA400 culture supernatants.
AU
Graves SF, Kobayashi SD, Braughton KR, Diep BA, Chambers HF, Otto M, Deleo FR
SO
Microbes Infect. 2010;12(6):446.
 
Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a cytolytic toxin associated with severe community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. However, the relative contribution of PVL to host cell lysis during CA-MRSA infection remains unknown. Here we investigated the relative contribution of PVL to human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plasma membrane permeability and lysis in vitro by using culture supernatants from wild-type and isogenic lukS/F-PV negative (Deltapvl) USA300 and USA400 strains. Using S. aureus culture conditions that favor selective high production of PVL (CCY medium), there was on average more PMN plasma membrane permeability and cell lysis caused by supernatants derived from wild-type strains compared with those from Deltapvl strains. Unexpectedly, plasma membrane permeability did not necessarily correlate with ultimate cell lysis. Moreover, the level of pore formation caused by culture supernatants varied dramatically (e.g., range was 0.32-99.09% for wild-type USA300 supernatants at 30 min) and was not attributable to differences in PMN susceptibility to PVL among human blood donors. We conclude that PMN pore formation assays utilizing S. aureus culture supernatants have limited ability to estimate the relative contribution of PVL to pathogenesis (or cytolysis in vitro or in vivo), especially when assayed using culture media that promote selective high production of PVL.
AD
Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 South 4th Street, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.
PMID
46
TI
Evolution of virulence in epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
AU
Li M, Diep BA, Villaruz AE, Braughton KR, Jiang X, DeLeo FR, Chambers HF, Lu Y, Otto M
SO
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009;106(14):5883.
 
Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged worldwide. The United States, in particular, is experiencing a serious epidemic of CA-MRSA that is almost entirely caused by an extraordinarily infectious strain named USA300. However, the molecular determinants underlying the pathogenic success of CA-MRSA are mostly unknown. To gain insight into the evolution of the exceptional potential of USA300 to cause disease, we compared the phylogeny and virulence of USA300 with that of closely related MRSA clones. We discovered that the sublineage from which USA300 evolved is characterized by a phenotype of high virulence that is clearly distinct from other MRSA strains. Namely, USA300 and its progenitor, USA500, had high virulence in animal infection models and the capacity to evade innate host defense mechanisms. Furthermore, our results indicate that increased virulence in the USA300/USA500 sublineage is attributable to differential expression of core genome-encoded virulence determinants, such as phenol-soluble modulins and alpha-toxin. Notably, the fact that the virulence phenotype of USA300 was already established in its progenitor indicates that acquisition of mobile genetic elements has played a limited role in the evolution of USA300 virulence and points to a possibly different role of those elements. Thus, our results highlight the importance of differential gene expression in the evolution of USA300 virulence. This finding calls for a profound revision of our notion about CA-MRSA pathogenesis at the molecular level and has important implications for design of therapeutics directed against CA-MRSA.
AD
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 South 4th Street, Hamilton, MT 59840, MD 20892, USA.
PMID