UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 40-43

of 'Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults who require hospitalization'

40
TI
Radiographic resolution of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the elderly.
AU
El Solh AA, Aquilina AT, Gunen H, Ramadan F
SO
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004;52(2):224.
 
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the radiographic clearance of proven community-acquired nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia in nonimmunocompromised older patients to provide working estimates of the rate of radiographic resolution as a function of the patient cumulative comorbidities, extent of initial radiographic involvement, functional status, and causative pathogens.
DESIGN: A prospective study.
PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-four patients aged 70 and older, consecutively admitted to a hospital for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.
SETTING: A university-affiliated teaching hospital.
MEASUREMENTS: Chest radiographs were performed every 3 weeks from the date of admission for a total period of 12 weeks or until all radiographic abnormalities had resolved or returned to baseline.
RESULTS: Sixty-four patients (86%) completed the study. The rate of radiographic clearance was estimated at 35.1% within 3 weeks, 60.2% within 6 weeks, and 84.2% within 12 weeks. Radiographic resolution was significantly slower for those with high comorbidity index, bacteremia, multilobar involvement, and enteric gram-negative bacilli pneumonias. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the comorbidity index (relative risk for clearance=0.67 per class index, P<.001) and multilobar disease (relative risk for clearance=0.24 for more than one lobe, P<.001) had independent predictive value (Cox proportional hazards regression model) on the rate of resolution.
CONCLUSION: The radiographic resolution of nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia in the elderly should take into account the extent of lobar disease and the burden of underlying illnesses. A waiting period of 12 to 14 weeks is recommended for slowly resolving pneumonia to be considered nonresolving.
AD
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, New York, USA. solh@buffalo.edu
PMID
41
TI
Epidemiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: a population-based study.
AU
Almirall J, Bolíbar I, Vidal J, Sauca G, Coll P, Niklasson B, BartoloméM, BalanzóX
SO
Eur Respir J. 2000;15(4):757.
 
In this prospective study, the authors assessed the incidence, aetiology, and outcome of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the general population. From December 1993 to November 1995, a study was performed in a mixed residential-industrial urban population of the "Maresme" region in Barcelona, Spain. All subjects>or =14 yrs of age (annual average population size 74,368 inhabitants) with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia were registered. All cases were re-evaluated by chest radiographs on the 5th day of illness and at monthly intervals until complete recovery. Urine and blood samples were obtained for culture and antigen detection. When lower respiratory tract secretions were obtained, these were also cultured. There were 241 patients with community-acquired pneumonia, with an annual incidence rate of 1.62 cases (95% confidence interval, 1.42-1.82) per 1,000 inhabitants. Incidence rates increased by age groups and were higher in males than in females. Of 232 patients with aetiological data, 104 had an identifiable aetiology. A total of 114 pathogens were found (single pathogen 94, two pathogens 10). There were 81 episodes of bacterial infection and 33 of viral infection. The most common pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and influenza A and B viruses. No case of Hantavirus infection was found. The rate of hospital admission was 61.4% with a mean+/-SD length of 11.7+/-10.1 days, a mean period of 23.0+/-14.3 days inactivity, and an overall mortality rate of 5%. The high rate of hospital admission, prolonged stay in hospital, and long period of inactivity all continue to constitute a social and health care burden of community-acquired pneumonia.
AD
Critical Care Unit, Hospital de Mataró, Barcelona, Spain.
PMID
42
TI
Comparison between pathogen directed antibiotic treatment and empirical broad spectrum antibiotic treatment in patients with community acquired pneumonia: a prospective randomised study.
AU
van der Eerden MM, Vlaspolder F, de Graaff CS, Groot T, Bronsveld W, Jansen HM, Boersma WG
SO
Thorax. 2005;60(8):672.
 
BACKGROUND: There is much controversy about the ideal approach to the management of community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Recommendations differ from a pathogen directed approach to an empirical strategy with broad spectrum antibiotics.
METHODS: In a prospective randomised open study performed between 1998 and 2000, a pathogen directed treatment (PDT) approach was compared with an empirical broad spectrum antibiotic treatment (EAT) strategy according to the ATS guidelines of 1993 in 262 hospitalised patients with CAP. Clinical efficacy was primarily determined by the length of hospital stay (LOS). Secondary outcome parameters for clinical efficacy were assessment of therapeutic failure on antibiotics, 30 day mortality, duration of antibiotic treatment, resolution of fever, side effects, and quality of life.
RESULTS: Three hundred and three patients were enrolled in the study; 41 were excluded, leaving 262 with results available for analysis. No significant differences were found between the two treatment groups in LOS, 30 day mortality, clinical failure, or resolution of fever. Side effects, although they did not have a significant influence on the outcome parameters, occurred more frequently in patients in the EAT group than in those in the PDT group (60% v 17%, 95% CI -0.5 to -0.3; p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: An EAT strategy with broad spectrum antibiotics for the management of hospitalised patients with CAP has comparable clinical efficacy to a PDT approach.
AD
Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Wilhelminalaan 12, 1815 JD, Alkmaar, the Netherlands.
PMID
43
TI
Early switch from intravenous to oral cephalosporins in the treatment of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.
AU
Ramirez JA, Srinath L, Ahkee S, Huang A, Raff MJ
SO
Arch Intern Med. 1995;155(12):1273.
 
BACKGROUND: Switch therapy is defined as the early transition from intravenous to oral antibiotics during treatment of infection. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcome and length of stay of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia treated with an early switch from intravenous to oral third-generation cephalosporins.
METHODS: Patients with a new roentgenographic pulmonary infiltrate and at least two symptoms (cough, fever, or leukocytosis) were enrolled in this study and treated with intravenous ceftizoxime sodium (1 g every 12 hours) or ceftriaxone sodium (1 g every 24 hours). Patients were switched to oral cefixime (400 mg every 24 hours) as soon as they met the following criteria: (1) resolution of fever; (2) improvement of cough and respiratory distress; (3) improvement of leukocytosis; and (4) presence of normal gastrointestinal tract absorption.
RESULTS: Of the 120 patients enrolled, 75 (62%) had clinical data evaluated. Long-term follow-up showed that 74 patients (99%) were cured; one patient required readmission for further intravenous therapy. Mean duration of hospital stay was 4 days.
CONCLUSIONS: This investigation demonstrated that an early switch to oral cefixime may be reasonable in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia who have already shown a good clinical and laboratory response to therapy with intravenous third-generation cephalosporins. This approach is clinically effective and minimizes hospital stay.
AD
Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (Ky) School of Medicine.
PMID