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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 33

of 'Treatment and prognosis of Graves' disease in children and adolescents'

33
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Graves' disease in children and adolescents: response to long-term treatment.
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Barrio R, López-CapapéM, Martinez-Badás I, Carrillo A, Moreno JC, Alonso M
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Acta Paediatr. 2005;94(11):1583.
 
BACKGROUND: Optimal treatment of Graves' disease in paediatric patients is still a matter of controversy. Antithyroid drugs, radioiodine and thyroidectomy are the three therapeutic options available.
AIM: To report our experience of long-term medical treatment and outcome of paediatric Graves' disease.
METHODS: A 5-y-long medical protocol was implemented in 20 children and adolescents with Graves' disease. All patients received antithyroid drugs as the first therapeutic option; patients who did not enter long-term remission received I(131) and/or surgery as the definitive treatment.
RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.1+/-4 y. Only two patients were males, both presenting concomitant type 1 diabetes. Mean follow-up was 13.8+/-5.5 y. Forty per cent of patients achieved long-term remission with low antithyroid drugs doses (mean treatment time: 5.4+/-1.4 y). Six patients received I(131) as definitive treatment and another six underwent surgery after completing medical treatment for 6.8+/-4.1 and 5.1+/-2 y, respectively. No patients requiring high antithyroid drugs doses to maintain euthyroidism reached long-term remission and needed I(131) and/or surgery.
CONCLUSION: Implementation of a long-term antithyroid drug protocol achieved 40% long-term remissions in paediatric patients with Graves' disease. Need for maintained high doses of antithyroid drugs could be considered a predictive factor for no remission. When permanent remission was not obtained by medical treatment, I(131)and/or surgery allowed healing in all cases.
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Paediatric Endocrine Unit, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain. rbarrio.hrc@salud.madrid.org
PMID