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Medline ® Abstracts for References 139-145

of 'Treatment and outcome of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy'

139
TI
Maternal vitamin K deficient embryopathy: association with hyperemesis gravidarum and Crohn disease.
AU
Toriello HV, Erick M, Alessandri JL, Bailey D, Brunetti-Pierri N, Cox H, Fryer A, Marty D, McCurdy C, Mulliken JB, Murphy H, Omlor J, Pauli RM, Ranells JD, Sanchez-Valle A, Tobiasz A, Van Maldergem L, Lin AE
SO
Am J Med Genet A. 2013;161A(3):417. Epub 2013 Feb 12.
 
Chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) is an etiologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by the radiographic finding of stippled epiphyses (punctate calcifications). It is often accompanied by a characteristic facial appearance, known as the Binder phenotype, which is attributed to hypoplasia of the nasal cartilages; abnormal distal phalanges (brachytelephalangy) are a common component manifestation as well. We report eight patients with a Binder phenotype with or without CDP who all shared a known or suspected maternal deficiency of vitamin K. We suspect that this phenotype is probably under recognized, and we hope to increase awareness about the maternal risk factors, especially hyperemesis gravidarum, which lead to nutritional deficiency.
AD
Genetic Services, Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. toriello@msu.edu
PMID
140
TI
Pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothoraces in a patient with hyperemesis gravidarum.
AU
Schwartz M, Rossoff L
SO
Chest. 1994;106(6):1904.
 
Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a severe form of the more common nausea of early pregnancy. We report an unusual case of pneumomediastinum and bilatetral pneumothoraces presenting in the tenth week of pregnancy complicating HG.
AD
Division of Pulmonary/Critical Care, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Long Island Campus for Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY.
PMID
141
TI
Pneumomediastinum secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum during early pregnancy.
AU
Yamamoto T, Suzuki Y, Kojima K, Sato T, Tanemura M, Kaji M, Yamakawa Y, Yokoi M, Suzumori K
SO
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001;80(12):1143.
 
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya City University Medical School, Nagoya, Japan. tamao-y@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp
PMID
142
TI
Hyperemesis gravidarum.
AU
Goodwin TM
SO
Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2008;35(3):401.
 
Hyperemesis gravidarum occurs in 0.3% to 2% of pregnant women, although populations with significantly higher rates have been reported. In clinical practice, hyperemesis gravidarum is identified by otherwise unexplained intractable vomiting and dehydration. This article discusses the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of hyperemesis gravidarum.
AD
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. tgoodwin@usc.edu
PMID
143
TI
Rhabdomyolysis secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum.
AU
Fukada Y, Ohta S, Mizuno K, Hoshi K
SO
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Jan;78(1):71.
 
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yamanashi Medical University, Japan.
PMID
144
TI
Diaphragmatic tear in pregnancy induced by intractable vomiting: a case report and review of the literature.
AU
Chen X, Yang X, Cheng W
SO
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012 Sep;25(9):1822-4. Epub 2011 Dec 15.
 
OBJECTIVE: Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, the most common medical condition of pregnancy, affects up to 80% of all pregnancies to some extent, and hyperemesis gravidarum does less than 1% of pregnant women. When hyperemesis gravidarum induces diaphragmatic tear, diagnosis can be missed because of nonspecific presentation with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting.
METHODS: We reported a pregnant case suffering from intractable vomiting at the beginning of the second trimester (the 13th week of gestation) with delayed diagnosis of diaphragmatic tearing.
RESULTS: The patient was misdiagnosed initially, which delayed the surgical intervention and unnecessary abortion.
CONCLUSION: It is worthwhile considering the maternal diaphragmatic cause as an unusual one of refractory vomiting accompanied by clinically significant progressive epigastric pain, distension and respiratory embarrassment.
AD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
PMID
145
TI
Ante- and postnatal risk factors of venous thrombosis: a hospital-based case-control study.
AU
Jacobsen AF, Skjeldestad FE, Sandset PM
SO
J Thromb Haemost. 2008;6(6):905.
 
OBJECTIVE: To study ante- and postnatal risk factors of venous thrombosis (VT) in pregnancy.
METHODS: A hospital-based case-control study. Cases were women with objectively verified VT during pregnancy or postpartum. Two controls were selected for each case. Validated risk factors were analyzed using chi-square test and logistic regression.
RESULTS: In total 559 cases with no prior VT, 268 ante- and 291 postnatal cases were identified together with 1229 controls. Risk factors for antenatal VT were assisted reproduction technique (ART), antepartum immobilization, cigarette smoking, and slight weight gain (<7 kg). Conception after ART and multiple pregnancy had an additive effect, whereas antepartum immobilization and high body mass index (BMI) had a multiplicative effect on the risk for antepartum VT. No other interaction was found between risk factors for antepartum VT. Risk factors for postnatal VT were antepartum immobilization, cigarette smoking, intrauterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR), preeclampsia, emergency cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, infection, surgery, and age and parity. Antepartum immobilization, high BMI and reoperation on the indication of bleeding showed multiplicative effects on the risk of postnatal VT.
CONCLUSIONS: Ante- and postpartum risk factors differed markedly. More attention should be paid to pregnant women of high BMI who are immobilized.
AD
Department of Hematology, and Faculty of Medicine, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
PMID