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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 64

of 'Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound'

64
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EUS-directed transgastric ERCP for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy: a minimally invasive approach.
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Kedia P, Tyberg A, Kumta NA, Gaidhane M, Karia K, Sharaiha RZ, Kahaleh M
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Gastrointest Endosc. 2015;82(3):560.
 
BACKGROUND: ERCP is challenging in patients with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Using EUS to gain access to the excluded stomach and subsequently performing transcutaneous ERCP was described recently.
OBJECTIVE: We describe our initial experience with an internal EUS-directed transgastric ERCP (EDGE) procedure by using a lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS).
DESIGN: Single-center case series.
SETTING: Tertiary center with expertise in EUS-guided procedures.
PATIENTS: Five patients with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass underwent EDGE via a LAMS.
INTERVENTIONS: A linear echoendoscope was used to access the excluded stomach. A LAMS was deployed over a wire to create a gastrogastric or jejunogastric fistula. A duodenoscope was then passed through the LAMS and conventional ERCP was performed.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Technical and clinical success rates as well as adverse events.
RESULTS: EUS-guided creation of a gastrogastric or jejunogastric fistula via placement of a LAMS was successful in all cases (100%). The ability to perform ERCP through the fashioned fistula during the index procedure was successful in 3 of 5 cases (60%). Two LAMS dislodgments requiring restenting were observed. No major adverse events were observed. No weight regain occurred. The median procedure time was 68.0 minutes.
LIMITATIONS: Small sample, single-institution experience.
CONCLUSION: The internal EDGE procedure may offer a cost-effective, minimally invasive option for a common problem in a growing patient demographic. Further refinement of the technique is required to minimize adverse events. (
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01522573.).
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Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA.
PMID