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Medline ® Abstracts for References 1-6

of 'Tattooing in adolescents and young adults'

1
TI
Prevalence of body art (body piercing and tattooing) in university undergraduates and incidence of medical complications.
AU
Mayers LB, Judelson DA, Moriarty BW, Rundell KW
SO
Mayo Clin Proc. 2002;77(1):29.
 
OBJECTIVES: To survey the prevalence of body art (body piercing and tattooing) in university undergraduate students and to determine the incidence of medical complications from these procedures.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Between February and May 2001, students were offered the opportunity to complete an anonymous, voluntary survey at the beginning of class or organizational meetings. The survey instrument requested information concerning body piercing and tattooing (current or removed) by body site, age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, undergraduate class, athletic status, and the occurrence of medical complications.
RESULTS: Four hundred fifty-four (94.4%) of 481 students completed the survey (14.7% of total campus enrollment). The prevalence of body piercing was 51%, and that of tattooing was 23%. The chi2 analysis showed female students were more likely to be pierced than males (P=.002); there was no significant difference in the prevalence of tattooing by sex. Male athletes were more likely to be tattooed than male nonathletes (P=.02). No relationships were shown between piercing/tattooing and age or measuresof body somatotype. The incidence of medical complications of piercing was 17%, and these complications included bleeding, tissue trauma, and bacterial infections. Pierced navels were particularly prone to infection. There were no reported medical complications from tattooing. Eighteen percent of piercings (58/315) and 4% of tattoos (6/149) had been removed.
CONCLUSIONS: Body art is prevalent among undergraduate university students, and there is a significant incidence of medical complications among students with piercing. Male athletes were significantly more likely to be tattooed than male nonathletes.
AD
Athletics Department, Pace University, Pleasantville, NY 10570, USA. lmayers@pace.edu
PMID
2
TI
Behavioral and self-concept differences in tattooed and nontattooed college students.
AU
Drews DR, Allison CK, Probst JR
SO
Psychol Rep. 2000;86(2):475.
 
235 college students rated themselves on a series of bipolar adjectives and answered questions about their involvement in a variety of "risky" behaviors, including tattooing and body piercing. 29 tattooed students rated themselves as more adventurous, creative, artistic, individualistic, and risky than those without tattoos. The 98 tattooed males considered themselves more attractive. Behaviorally, those with tattoos reported smoking more cigarettes. Tattooed men also reported more sexual partners, were more likely to report they had been arrested, and were more likely to have body piercings. The 21 tattooed women were more likely to report use of drugs other than alcohol, shoplifting, and body piercings in places other than their ears.
AD
Psychology Department, Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA 16652, USA. Drews@juniata.edu
PMID
3
TI
College students with tattoos and piercings: motives, family experiences, personality factors, and perception by others.
AU
Forbes GB
SO
Psychol Rep. 2001;89(3):774.
 
The motives, family experiences, and personality characteristics of 341 college students with and without tattoos or piercings were studied. Participants completed Lippa's 1991 measures of the Big Five personality factors, a shortened version of the Body Cathexis Scale, a series of questions about their childhood experiences, and questions about risk-taking behaviors. In addition, reasons to have or not have body modifications and the perceptions of people with body modifications were investigated. Of the 116 men and 186 women, 25% and 33%, respectively, had at least one tattoo or body piercing. There were very few differences in the childhood experiences or personality characteristics of people with or without body modifications. Although people with body modifications did not differ from people without modifications on the Big Five personality measures, people without modifications perceived people with modifications as much different from themselves on these measures. These results indicate that tattoos and piercings in college students are associated with significantly more risk-taking behavior, greater use of alcohol and marijuana, and less social conformity. However, the traditional stereotype that body modifications are indicators of social or personal pathology does not describe contemporary college students.
AD
Department of Behavioral Sciences, Millikin University, Decatur, IL 62522, USA. GFORBES@MAIL.MILLIKIN.EDU
PMID
4
TI
Tattoos and body piercings in the United States: a national data set.
AU
Laumann AE, Derick AJ
SO
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006;55(3):413.
 
BACKGROUND: Little is known about the prevalence and consequences of body art application.
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to provide US tattooing and body piercing prevalence, societal distribution, and medical and social consequence data.
METHODS: Random digit dialing technology was used to obtain a national probability sample of 253 women and 247 men who were 18 to 50 years of age.
RESULTS: Of our respondents, 24% had tattoos and 14% had body piercings. Tattooing was equally common in both sexes, but body piercing was more common among women. Other associations were a lack of religious affiliation, extended jail time, previous drinking, and recreational drug use. Local medical complications, including broken teeth, were present in one third of those with body piercings. The prevalence of jewelry allergy increased with the number of piercings. Of those with tattoos, 17% were considering removal but none had had a tattoo removed.
LIMITATIONS: This was a self-reported data set with a 33% response rate.
CONCLUSION: Tattooing and body piercing are associated with risk-taking activities. Body piercing has a high incidence of medical complications.
AD
Section of Dermatology, University of Chicago, USA. a-laumann@northwestern.edu
PMID
5
TI
Sequential survey of body piercing and tattooing prevalence and medical complication incidence among college students.
AU
Mayers L, Chiffriller S
SO
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007;161(12):1219.
 
AD
Division of Sports Medicine, Pace University, 861 Bedford Rd, Pleasantville, NY 10570, USA. lmayers@pace.edu
PMID
6
 
 
Tattoo takeover: Three in ten Americans have tattoos, and most don't stop at just one www.theharrispoll.com/health-and-life/Tattoo_Takeover.html (Accessed on April 26, 2016).
 
no abstract available