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Medline ® Abstract for Reference 5

of 'Sepsis syndromes in adults: Epidemiology, definitions, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and prognosis'

5
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Sepsis-associated mortality in England: an analysis of multiple cause of death data from 2001 to 2010.
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McPherson D, Griffiths C, Williams M, Baker A, Klodawski E, Jacobson B, Donaldson L
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BMJ Open. 2013;3(8) Epub 2013 Aug 2.
 
OBJECTIVES: To quantify mortality associated with sepsis in the whole population of England.
DESIGN: Descriptive statistics of multiple cause of death data.
SETTING: England between 2001 and 2010.
PARTICIPANTS: All people whose death was registered in England between 2001 and 2010 and whose certificate contained a sepsis-associated International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) code.
DATA SOURCES: Multiple cause of death data extracted from Office for National Statistics mortality database.
STATISTICAL METHODS: Age-specific and sex-specific death rates and direct age-standardised death rates.
RESULTS: In 2010, 5.1% of deaths in England were definitely associated with sepsis. Adding those that may be associated with sepsis increases this figure to 7.7% of all deaths. Only 8.6% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis in 2010 had a sepsis-related condition as the underlying cause of death. 99% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis have one of the three ICD-10 codes-A40, A41 and P36-in at least one position on the death certificate. 7% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis in 2001-2010 did not occur in hospital.
CONCLUSIONS: Sepsis is a major public health problem in England. In attempting to tackle the problem of sepsis, it is not sufficient to rely on hospital-based statistics, or methods of intervention, alone. A robust estimate of the burden of sepsis-associated mortality in England can be made by identifying deaths with one of the three ICD-10 codes in multiple cause of death data. These three codes could be used for future monitoring of the burden of sepsis-associated mortality.
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Imperial College London, London, UK.
PMID