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Recognition and management of high-risk (aggressive) cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

Authors
Jennifer A DeSimone, MD
Pritesh S Karia, MPH
Chrysalyne D Schmults, MD, MSCE
Section Editor
June K Robinson, MD
Deputy Editor
Rosamaria Corona, MD, DSc

INTRODUCTION

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a relatively common malignancy derived from epidermal keratinocytes. Although most patients with cutaneous SCC present with localized disease that is cured with local treatment, tumor recurrence, metastasis, and death related to this disease occasionally occur. "High-risk" cutaneous SCCs are tumors that exhibit clinical or histologic features that have been associated with increased risk for aggressive tumor behavior. The best approach to the management of high-risk cutaneous SCC is not definitively known. Mohs micrographic surgery, surgical excision with complete tissue margin assessment, and radiation therapy are commonly used in the management of these lesions.

The clinical and pathological features of high-risk cutaneous SCC and the management of patients with these tumors will be reviewed here. The risk factors and diagnosis of cutaneous SCC, the treatment of low-risk cutaneous SCC, and systemic therapy for advanced cutaneous SCC are reviewed separately. (See "Epidemiology and risk factors for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma" and "Clinical features and diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)" and "Evaluation for locoregional and distant metastases in cutaneous squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma" and "Treatment and prognosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma" and "Systemic treatment of advanced cutaneous squamous and basal cell carcinomas".)

BACKGROUND

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common human cancer with an estimated annual incidence of 186,157 to 419,843 cases in the United States [1]. Cutaneous SCC may occur in individuals of all races and ethnicities, but most frequently occurs in people with light skin who sunburn easily. Highly-curable, localized cutaneous SCC occurs most frequently; locoregional or distant metastases develop in less than 1 percent to 5 percent of cases [2-6]. However, it has been estimated that deaths from cutaneous SCC are as common in the central and southern United States as deaths from many other common cancers including melanoma, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, renal cancer, and bladder cancer [1]. (See "Epidemiology and risk factors for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma", section on 'Epidemiology'.)

Although the literature supports a correlation between certain clinical and pathological features of cutaneous SCC with increased risk for tumor recurrence and metastasis (table 1), a lack of consensus over the definition of high-risk cutaneous SCC, a paucity of high-quality therapeutic studies, and the absence of a prognostic model that integrates multiple risk factors have made the prediction of patient outcomes and the formation of definitive management guidelines challenging. As an example, a survey-based study of 117 Mohs surgeons found a lack of consistency in the approach to the evaluation and management of high-risk SCC [7].

HIGH-RISK FEATURES

A wide variety of clinical and histopathologic factors have been proposed as indicators of increased risk for recurrence or metastasis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, as noted above, a consensus on which features define high-risk cutaneous SCC has not been established; major entities such as the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) describe dissimilar "high-risk" criteria (table 2A-B) [4,8]. In a retrospective study of 269 tumors, considerable discordance was observed between AJCC and NCCN definitions of high-risk cutaneous SCC. A small proportion of tumors were considered high-risk under the 2010 AJCC staging guidelines (14 percent), while a majority of tumors were considered high-risk under the NCCN guidelines (87 percent) [9]. Examples of factors that have been associated with increased risk for metastasis or death on multivariate analysis in cohort studies include: clinical tumor diameter 2 cm or greater, depth of invasion >6 mm or beyond the subcutaneous fat, poor differentiation, perineural invasion, location on the ear, and immunosuppression [2,10-12]. These may be the most significant drivers of poor outcomes in SCC. However, all major characteristics that have been associated with aggressive tumor behavior are reviewed below (table 1).

                                

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Tue Sep 20 00:00:00 GMT+00:00 2016.
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