Medline ® Abstracts for References 9,10

of 'Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and irritant-induced asthma'

9
TI
Persistent hyperreactivity and reactive airway dysfunction in firefighters at the World Trade Center.
AU
Banauch GI, Alleyne D, Sanchez R, Olender K, Cohen HW, Weiden M, Kelly KJ, Prezant DJ
SO
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003;168(1):54.
 
New York City Fire Department rescue workers experienced massive exposure to airborne particulates at the World Trade Center site. Aims of this longitudinal study were to (1) determine if bronchial hyperreactivity was present, persistent, and independently associated with exposure intensity, (2) identify objective measures shortly after the collapse that would predict persistent hyperreactivity and a diagnosis of reactive airways dysfunction 6 months post-collapse. A representative sample of 179 rescue workers stratified by exposure intensity (high, moderate, and control) without current smoking or prior respiratory disease was enrolled. Highly exposed workers arrived within 2 hours of collapse, moderately exposed workers arrived later on Days 1-2; control subjects were not exposed. Hyperreactivity at 1, 3, and 6 months post-collapse was associated with exposure intensity, independent of ex-smoking and airflow obstruction. Six months post-collapse, highly exposed workers were 6.8 times more likely than moderately exposed workers and control subjects to be hyperreactive (95% confidence interval, 1.8-25.2; p = 0.004), and hyperreactivity persisted in 55% of those hyperreactive at 1 and/or 3 months. In highly exposed subjects, hyperreactivity 1 or 3 months post-collapse was the sole predictor for reactive airways dysfunction (p = 0.021). In conclusion, development and persistence of hyperreactivity and reactive airways dysfunction were strongly and independently associated with exposure intensity. Hyperreactivity shortly post-collapse predicted reactive airways dysfunction at 6 months in highly exposed workers; this has important implications for disaster management.
AD
Professor of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Pulmonary Division, Centennial 423, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. Prezd@dnamail.com
PMID
10
TI
Nonsensitizing causes of occupational asthma.
AU
Lemière C, Malo JL, Gautrin D
SO
Med Clin North Am. 1996;80(4):749.
 
Irritant-induced asthma and RADS are related conditions that need further study focusing on the following questions: (1) Are there differences between the pathologic and functional features that follow single or multiple exposures to an irritant material? (2) What is the time course of the changes? (3) What are the physiologic correlates in terms of onset of airway hyperresponsiveness? (4) What are the risk markers (besides exposure)? (5) Are there means of modulating the reaction by using anti-inflammatory preparations? Developing an animal model of irritant-induced asthma and conducting prospective epidemiologic surveys in high-risk workers may be most effective routes to provide satisfactory answers to these questions. Further examination of the physiopathology of such conditions as byssinosis, grain-dust-induced respiratory disease, and aluminum potroom asthma as well as of the differences from and similarities to OA is also warranted.
AD
Department of Chest Medicine, Sacré-Coeur Hospital, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
PMID