Medline ® Abstracts for References 55,56

of 'Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and irritant-induced asthma'

55
TI
Occupational lower airway disease in relation to World Trade Center inhalation exposure.
AU
de la Hoz RE
SO
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;11(2):97.
 
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the knowledge about the occupational lower airway diseases that seem related to exposures at the World Trade Center disaster site.
RECENT FINDINGS: Those diseases have been characterized as irritant-induced asthma, chronic nonspecific bronchitis, chronic bronchiolitis/small airway disease, and aggravated preexistent chronic obstructive lung disease (most frequently chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but also asthma), with the expected overlapping features among them. One remarkable characteristic of the irritant-induced asthma observed among these workers was the slow onset of symptoms and long delay in clinical diagnoses.
SUMMARY: Longitudinal studies suggest that both the incidence and the associated functional decline of these predominantly obstructive lung diseases stabilized several years ago, but longer follow-up is clearly necessary.
AD
Departments of Preventive Medicine and Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Rafael.delaHoz@mssm.edu
PMID
56
TI
Can reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) transform into occupational asthma due to "sensitisation" to isocyanates?
AU
Leroyer C, Perfetti L, Cartier A, Malo JL
SO
Thorax. 1998;53(2):152.
 
The case history is described of a worker who presented with a history suggestive of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome which occurred after an acute high level inhalation of diphenylmethane diisocyanate. Further exposure at work, at a time when concentrations of isocyanates were no longer "irritant", suggested occupational asthma; this diagnosis was confirmed by a specific inhalation challenge test.
AD
DEpartment of Chest Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur, Gouin, Montréal Canada.
PMID