Medline ® Abstracts for References 30,51

of 'Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and irritant-induced asthma'

30
TI
Excess incidence of asthma among Finnish cleaners employed in different industries.
AU
Karjalainen A, Martikainen R, Karjalainen J, Klaukka T, Kurppa K
SO
Eur Respir J. 2002;19(1):90.
 
The incidence and risk of asthma among female cleaners employed in different industries was explored. An increased risk of asthma has been associated with the cleaning profession, in some but not all studies. All Finnish females employed as cleaners and all those employed in administrative work were followed for asthma incidence through a record linkage in 1986-1998. An individual was defined as an "incident case of asthma" if they received rights for special reimbursement of asthma medication from the national health insurance or were recognized as having occupational asthma. Age-adjusted relative risks (RR) were estimated for cleaners in comparison with those employed in administrative work. There were 2,414 and 5,235 cases of asthma among the cleaners and administrative workers, respectively. The RR was 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-1.57) in cleaners. The risk was increased in cleaners working in nearly all major sectors of economic activity, but cleaners employed by companies concerned with the manufacture of basic metals (RR 2.47; 95% CI 1.68-3.64) and food products (RR 2.19; 95% CI 1.69-2.85) had the highest risk. Only 25 of the "cases of asthma" among cleaners had been recognized as being occupational asthma. It could be concluded that cleaners have an increased risk of persistent adult-onset asthma. Factors inherent to the environment where cleaning is performed or differences in the cleaning agents used may explain the observed differences between industries.
AD
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Dept of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Helsinki.
PMID
51
TI
Air trapping detected on end-expiratory high-resolution computed tomography in symptomatic World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers.
AU
Mendelson DS, Roggeveen M, Levin SM, Herbert R, de la Hoz RE
SO
J Occup Environ Med. 2007;49(8):840.
 
OBJECTIVES: We utilized end-expiratory chest computed tomography (CT) to investigate air trapping (AT) in symptomatic former World Trade Center (WTC) workers, and correlated the findings with clinical, physiological, and exposure-related characteristics.
METHODS: Twenty-nine WTC workers with lower respiratory symptoms were evaluated. Clinical data included symptom inventories, quantitative respiratory symptom scores, WTC dust exposure duration, pulmonary function tests, and inspiratory and end-expiratory high-resolution chest CT scans. The latter were scored quantitatively for AT (by two methods) and interstitial changes, and those scores were correlated with the clinical data.
RESULTS: The two AT scoring methods yielded highly correlated results. AT was demonstrated in 25 of 29 patients, with scores ranging from 0 to 24 (mean, 10.6). There was a statistically significant correlation between AT and the duration of dust exposure. AT scores were significantly higher in patients with restrictive lung function data, and in lifetime nonsmokers.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that AT from small airways disease may account for some of the reported clinical and pulmonary functional abnormalities in WTC dust-exposed workers, and support the use of high-resolution CT scans in the investigation and characterization of the pulmonary ailments of selected workers.
AD
Department of Radiology, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.
PMID