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Medline ® Abstracts for References 26,28

of 'Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and irritant-induced asthma'

26
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Work-related reactive airways dysfunction syndrome cases from surveillance in selected US states.
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Henneberger PK, Derk SJ, Davis L, Tumpowsky C, Reilly MJ, Rosenman KD, Schill DP, Valiante D, Flattery J, Harrison R, Reinisch F, Filios MS, Tift B
SO
J Occup Environ Med. 2003;45(4):360.
 
The objective was to elaborate the descriptive epidemiology of work-related cases of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Cases of work-related asthma (WRA) were identified in four states in the United States during 1993-1995 as part of the Sentinel Event Notification Systems for Occupational Risks (SENSOR). Information gathered by follow-back interview was used to describe 123 work-related RADS cases and to compare them to 301 other WRA cases whose onset of disease was associated with a known asthma inducer. RADS represented 14% of all new-onset WRA cases identified by the state SENSOR surveillance systems. RADS cases had significant adverse medical and occupational outcomes identified by follow-back interview. In particular, 89% still had breathing problems, 78% had ever sought emergency care and 39% had ever been hospitalized for work-related breathing problems, 54% had applied for worker compensation benefits, and 41% had left the company where they experienced onset of asthma. These values equaled or exceeded the comparable figures for those WRA cases whose onset was attributed to a known inducer. Work-related RADS represents a minority of all WRA cases, but the adverse impact of this condition appears toequal that of other WRA cases.
AD
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1095 Willowdale Road M/S H-2800, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA. pkh0@cdc.gov
PMID
28
TI
Asthma related to cleaning agents: a clinical insight.
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Vandenplas O, D'Alpaos V, Evrard G, Jamart J, Thimpont J, Huaux F, Renauld JC
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BMJ Open. 2013;3(9):e003568.
 
OBJECTIVE: To determine the agents causing asthmatic reactions during specific inhalation challenges (SICs) in workers with cleaning-related asthma symptoms and to assess the pattern of bronchial responses in order to identify the mechanisms involved in cleaning-related asthma.
DESIGN: A retrospective case series analysis.
SETTING: The study included all participants who completed an SIC procedure with the cleaning/disinfection products suspected of causing work-related asthma over the period 1992-2011 in a tertiary centre, which is the single specialised centre of the French-speaking part of Belgium where all participants with work-related asthma are referred to for SIC.
RESULTS: The review identified 44 participants who completed an SIC with cleaning/disinfection agents. Challenge exposure to the suspected cleaning agents elicited a‚Č•20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in 17 (39%) participants. The cleaning products that induced a positive SIC contained quaternary ammonium compounds (n=10), glutaraldehyde (n=3), both of these agents (n=1) and ethanolamines (n=2). Positive SICs were associated with a significant decrease in the median (IQR) value of the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) from 1.4 (0.2-4.2) mg/mL at baseline to 0.5 (0.4-3.0) mg/mL after the challenge and a significant increase in sputum eosinophils from 1.8 (0.8-7.2)% at baseline to 10.0 (4.1-15.9)% 7 h after the challenge exposure while these parameters did not significantly change in participants with a negative SIC. Overall, 11 of 17 participants with positive SICs showed greater than threefold decrease in postchallenge histamine PC20 value, a>2% increase in sputum eosinophils, or both of these outcomes.
CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that a substantial proportion of workers who experience asthma symptoms related to cleaning materials show a pattern of bronchial reaction consistent with sensitiser-induced occupational asthma. The results also suggest that quaternary ammonium compounds are the principal cause of sensitiser-induced occupational asthma among cleaners.
AD
Department of Chest Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mont-Godinne, UniversitéCatholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium.
PMID