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Medline ® Abstracts for References 21,25

of 'Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and irritant-induced asthma'

21
TI
Outbreak of the reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after a spill of glacial acetic acid.
AU
Kern DG
SO
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144(5):1058.
 
The reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) defines a chronic asthmalike illness with airway hyperresponsiveness that develops within 24 h of a single, brief, highly irritating inhalation exposure. Support for the syndrome has been limited to case reports. A chemical spill, exposing hospital employees to 100% acetic acid, offered an opportunity to more convincingly establish the existence of RADS. All 56 exposed subjects were asked both to complete a questionnaire focusing on their preexposure health status, potential for exposure, and symptom development after the accident, 8 months after the spill, and to undergo methacholine challenge testing to detect airway hyperresponsiveness. An industrial hygienist, blinded to clinical data, estimated each subject's exposure. Preemployment health history forms were reviewed to assess recall bias. The study questionnaire was returned by 51 (91%) subjects; 24 (47%) consented to methacholine challenge, including 7 of the 8 with RADS-consistent symptoms. Diagnostic criteria for RADS were satisfied by none of 7 (0%) subjects with low exposure, 1 of 30 (3.3%) with medium exposure, and 3 of 14 (21.4%) with high exposure (test of trend p value = 0.021). The odds ratio estimate of the relative risk of RADS in subjects with high exposure was 9.8 (95% Cl, 0.902 to 264.6). Neither stratified analysis nor review of the preemployment health history forms revealed evidence of confounding or recall bias, respectively. The reactive airways dysfunction syndrome appears to be a valid clinical entity. Further study of RADS is especially appropriate given increasing evidence that airway inflammation may be etiologically important in all asthma.
AD
Department of Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Pawtucket 02860.
PMID
25
TI
Cleaning products and work-related asthma.
AU
Rosenman KD, Reilly MJ, Schill DP, Valiante D, Flattery J, Harrison R, Reinisch F, Pechter E, Davis L, Tumpowsky CM, Filios M
SO
J Occup Environ Med. 2003;45(5):556.
 
To describe the characteristics of individuals with work-related asthma associated with exposure to cleaning products, data from the California-, Massachusetts-, Michigan-, and New Jersey state-based surveillance systems of work-related asthma were used to identify cases of asthma associated with exposure to cleaning products at work. From 1993 to 1997, 236 (12%) of the 1915 confirmed cases of work-related asthma identified by the four states were associated with exposure to cleaning products. Eighty percent of the reports were of new-onset asthma and 20% were work-aggravated asthma. Among the new-onset cases, 22% were consistent with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Individuals identified were generally women (75%), white non-Hispanic (68%), and 45 years or older (64%). Their most likely exposure had been in medical settings (39%), schools (13%), or hotels (6%), and they were most likely to work as janitor/cleaners (22%), nurse/nurses' aides (20%), or clerical staff (13%). However, cases were reported with exposure to cleaning products across a wide range of job titles. Cleaning products contain a diverse group of chemicals that are used in a wide range of industries and occupations as well as in the home. Their potential to cause or aggravate asthma has recently been recognized. Further work to characterize the specific agents and the circumstances of their use associated with asthma is needed. Additional research to investigate the frequency of adverse respiratory effects among regular users, such as housekeeping staff, is also needed. In the interim, we recommend attention to adequate ventilation, improved warning labels and Material Safety Data Sheets, and workplace training and education.
AD
Michigan State University, 117 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. Rosenman@msu.edu
PMID