UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstract for Reference 44

of 'Radiation therapy techniques for newly diagnosed, non-metastatic breast cancer'

44
TI
Optimizing breast cancer treatment efficacy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy.
AU
Vicini FA, Sharpe M, Kestin L, Martinez A, Mitchell CK, Wallace MF, Matter R, Wong J
SO
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002;54(5):1336.
 
PURPOSE: To present our clinical experience using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to improve dose uniformity and treatment efficacy in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy.
METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 281 patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy received whole breast RT after lumpectomy using our static, multileaf collimator (sMLC) IMRT technique. The technical and practical aspects of implementing this technique on a large scale in the clinic were analyzed. The clinical outcome of patients treated with this technique was also reviewed.
RESULTS: The median time required for three-dimensional alignment of the tangential fields and dosimetric IMRT planning was 40 and 45 min, respectively. The median number of sMLC segments required per patient to meet the predefined dose-volume constraints was 6 (range 3-12). The median percentage of the treatment given with open fields (no sMLC segments) was 83% (range 38-96%), and the median treatment time was<10 min. The median volume ofbreast receiving 105% of the prescribed dose was 11% (range 0-67.6%). The median breast volume receiving 110% of the prescribed dose was 0% (range 0-39%), and the median breast volume receiving 115% of the prescribed dose was also 0%. A total of 157 patients (56%) experienced Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 0 or I acute skin toxicity; 102 patients (43%) developed Grade II acute skin toxicity and only 3 (1%) experienced Grade III toxicity. The cosmetic results at 12 months (95 patients analyzable) were rated as excellent/good in 94 patients (99%). No skin telengiectasias, significant fibrosis, or persistent breast pain was noted.
CONCLUSION: The use of intensity modulation with our sMLC technique for tangential whole breast RT is an efficient method for achieving a uniform and standardized dose throughout the whole breast. Strict dose-volume constraints can be readily achieved resulting in both uniform coverage of breast tissue and a potential reduction in acute and chronic toxicities. Because the median number of sMLC segments required per patient is only 6, the treatment time is equivalent to conventional wedged-tangent treatment techniques. As a result, widespread implementation of this technology can be achieved with minimal imposition on clinic resources and time constraints.
AD
Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI 48073, USA. fvicini@beaumont.edu
PMID