UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 87,97-101

of 'Prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults'

87
TI
A multicentre, double-blind study comparing placebo, ondansetron and ondansetron plus dexamethasone for the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis. Ondansetron Delayed Emesis Study Group.
AU
Olver I, Paska W, Depierre A, Seitz JF, Stewart DJ, Goedhals L, McQuade B, McRae J, Wilkinson JR
SO
Ann Oncol. 1996;7(9):945.
 
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral ondansetron, given alone or in combination with dexamethasone in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was an international, multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. A total of 640 chemotherapy-naïve patients received ondansetron 8 mg i.v. and dexamethasone 20 mg i.v. for the control of acute emesis prior to cisplatin (>or = 70 mg/m2) on day 1. Patients who were not rescued or withdrawn on day 1 were to be randomised 24 hours after the start of cisplatin administration to one of four groups; group I placebo oral (p.o.), twice daily (bd) on days 2-6 (n = 125); group II ondansetron (8 mg p.o. bd) on days 2/3 followed by placebo (p.o. bd) on days 4-6 (n = 199); group III ondansetron (8 mg p.o. bd) on days 2-6 (n = 214); group IV ondansetron (8 mg p.o. bd) plus dexamethasone (4 mg p.o. bd) on days 2-6 (n = 66).
RESULTS: On day 1, 81% of patients had complete control of acute emesis,with 68% having no emesis and no nausea. Over days 2/3 and over days 2-6, significantly more patients receiving ondansetron plus dexamethasone (group IV) reported no emesis and no nausea (49% and 45%, respectively) compared to ondansetron alone (32% and 27%, respectively) or placebo (group I; 33% and 27%, respectively; P<0.05 for all pairwise comparisons). There were no significant differences in the control of emesis over days 2/3, where 61% of patients had complete emetic control (0 emetic episodes) with ondansetron plus dexamethasone (group IV), 54% with ondansetron (groups II + III) and 49% with placebo (group I). In the distribution of nausea grades, ondansetron plus dexamethasone (group IV) was significantly superior to ondansetron (groups II + III); P = 0.037) and placebo (group I; P = 0.013) over days 2/3. Over days 2-6 there were no significant differences in the control of emesis, however a comparison of the distribution of nausea grades over days 2-6 showed ondansetron plus dexamethasone (group IV) to be significantly superior to ondansetron (group III; P = 0.043) and placebo (group I; P = 0.024). All treatments were well tolerated and no unexpected drug-related adverse events were reported. There were no differences in the overall incidence of adverse events between the active treatment groups or placebo. Constipation and headache, recognised side effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, were the most commonly reported adverse events with the incidence of constipation with ondansetron alone (group III) being significantly greater than with over days 2-6 (14% vs. 6%; P = 0.030).
CONCLUSION: In contrast to some previous investigations, in this study, ondansetron alone appears to have a minor role in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis and nausea. In conclusion, the combination of oral ondansetron plus dexamethasone is superior to ondansetron and to placebo.
AD
Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
PMID
97
TI
Aprepitant versus metoclopramide, both combined with dexamethasone, for the prevention of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis: a randomized, double-blind study.
AU
Roila F, Ruggeri B, Ballatori E, Fatigoni S, Caserta C, Licitra L, Mirabile A, Ionta MT, Massidda B, Cavanna L, Palladino MA, Tocci A, Fava S, Colantonio I, Angelelli L, Ciuffreda L, Fasola G, Zerilli F, Italian Group for Antiemetic Research
SO
Ann Oncol. 2015 Jun;26(6):1248-53. Epub 2015 Mar 5.
 
BACKGROUND: A combination of aprepitant, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (r.a.), and dexamethasone is recommended for the prophylaxis of cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting in the acute phase, and aprepitant + dexamethasone (A + D) in the delayed phase. The aim of this study was to verify if A + D is superior to metoclopramide plus dexamethasone (M + D) in preventing delayed emesis in cancer patients receiving the same prophylaxis for acute emesis.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomized double-blind study comparing A + D versus M + D was completed in previously untreated cancer patients. Before chemotherapy, all patients were treated with intravenous palonosetron 0.25 mg and dexamethasone 12 mg, and oral aprepitant 125 mg. On day 2-4, patients randomly received oral dexamethasone 8 mg plus aprepitant 80 mg once daily (days 2-3) or metoclopramide 20 mg four times daily plus dexamethasone 8 mg bid. Primary endpoint was rate of complete response (no vomiting, no rescue treatment) in day 2-5 after chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Due to difficulty in the accrual of patients, 303 of the 480 planned patients were enrolled, 284 were fully evaluable, 147 receiving A + D, 137 M + D. Day 1 results were similar in both arms. On day 2-5, complete response rate was not significantly different (80.3% with A + D versus 82.5% with M + D, P<0.38, respectively), and all secondary endpoints were also similar (complete protection, total control, no vomiting, no nausea, and score of Functional Living Index-Emesis; P<0.24). Adverse events incidence was not significantly different between the two treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: In cancer patients submitted to cisplatin-based chemotherapy, receiving the same antiemetic prophylaxis for acute emesis, A + D is not superior to M + D in preventing delayed emesis, and both treatments present similar toxicity.
CLINICALTRIALSGOV NUMBER: NCT00869310.
AD
Medical Oncology Division, 'S. Maria' Hospital, Terni roila.fausto@libero.it.
PMID
98
TI
Oral ondansetron for the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis: a large, multicenter, double-blind, randomized comparative trial of ondansetron versus placebo.
AU
Navari RM, Madajewicz S, Anderson N, Tchekmedyian NS, Whaley W, Garewal H, Beck TM, Chang AY, Greenberg B, Caldwell KC
SO
J Clin Oncol. 1995;13(9):2408.
 
PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of oral ondansetron in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis in patients who do not require rescue antiemetic therapy for acute emesis.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Five hundred thirty-eight chemotherapy-naive patients who received cisplatin chemotherapy (>or = 70 mg/m2), and who were not rescued for acute emesis, were eligible to be randomized to receive one of the three oral regimens to control delayed emesis. Group I received placebo on days 2 to 6; group II received ondansetron 8 mg twice daily on days 2 and 3 and placebo on days 4 to 6; group III received ondansetron 8 mg twice daily on days 2 to 6. All patients received intravenous ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg every 4 hours for three doses) for the control of acute emesis on day 1. The number of emetic episodes on days 2 and 3 combined (days 2/3, when incidence and severity of delayed emesis were expected to be greatest) was considered the primary measure of efficacy.
RESULTS: Patients who received odansetron had significantly feweremetic episodes on days 2/3, 4, and 5 than those who received placebo (P<or = .002 on each day). Additionally, significantly more patients who received ondansetron had a complete plus major response (C+MR;<or = two two emetic episodes) than those who received placebo on days 2/3 (56% v 37%, P = .001), 4 (94% v 85%, P = .005), and 5 (98% v 88%, P = .006). Patients who received ondansetron had significantly less nausea on day 2/3 when day-1 nausea was used as the baseline score (P = .025). Patients who received ondansetron also had significantly less nausea on day 4 (P = .042) and the results approached significance on day 5 (P = .066).
CONCLUSION: Oral ondansetron had a significant effect in the control of cisplatin-induced delayed emesis and nausea in patients who had not required rescue antiemetics during the acute emesis period. The control of delayed nausea and vomiting was most notable in the immediate 2 days following cisplatin administration, with the clinical difference narrowing between the two treatment arms on subsequent days.
AD
Simon-Williamson Clinic, Birmingham, AL 35211, USA.
PMID
99
TI
Use of dexamethasone and granisetron in the control of delayed emesis for patients who receive highly emetogenic chemotherapy. National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group.
AU
Latreille J, Pater J, Johnston D, Laberge F, Stewart D, Rusthoven J, Hoskins P, Findlay B, McMurtrie E, Yelle L, Williams C, Walde D, Ernst S, Dhaliwal H, Warr D, Shepherd F, Mee D, Nishimura L, Osoba D, Zee B
SO
J Clin Oncol. 1998;16(3):1174.
 
PURPOSE: To evaluate the roles of granisetron and dexamethasone for emesis control on days 2 through 7 after the administration of cisplatin in doses of 50 mg/m2 or greater to patients who had not previously received chemotherapy.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four hundred thirty-five eligible and assessable patients were randomized to one of two arms in a double-blind fashion: arm A; granisetron 3 mg intravenous (i.v.) plus dexamethasone 10 mg i.v. prechemotherapy followed by granisetron 1 mg orally at 6 and 12 hours, then granisetron 1 mg orally and dexamethasone 8 mg orally twice daily on days 2 through 7 (219 patients); arm B; as in arm A but with placebo substituted for granisetron on days 2 through 7 (216 patients). All patients completed diaries in which episodes of emesis and severity of nausea were recorded.
RESULTS: The addition of granisetron on days 2 through 7 had no discernable impact on nauseaand vomiting during this period.
CONCLUSION: The administration of a 5-hydroxytryptamine3, receptor (5-HT3) antagonist, in this case granisetron, after 24 hours conferred no benefit. This negative result needs to be assessed in light of conflicting literature, but at present it does not appear that the routine use of these drugs in this setting is justified.
AD
Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal Hospital, Québec, Canada. jlatrei@cam.org
PMID
100
TI
Control of delayed nausea and vomiting with granisetron plus dexamethasone or dexamethasone alone in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative study.
AU
Goedhals L, Heron JF, Kleisbauer JP, Pagani O, Sessa C
SO
Ann Oncol. 1998;9(6):661.
 
BACKGROUND: The efficacies of granisetron plus dexamethasone and dexamethasone alone in controlling delayed nausea and vomiting after cisplatin chemotherapy (>or = 69 mg/m2) were compared in a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparative study.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all, 654 patients (of whom 619 were evaluable) received prophylactic granisetron plus dexamethasone before chemotherapy on day 0; on day 1 complete responders and non-responders were randomized separately to receive dexamethasone, 8 mg b.d. p.o., with either granisetron, 1 mg b.d. p.o., or matching placebo for six days.
RESULTS: Over days 1-6 the complete response rates were 54.5% (dexamethasone group) and 52.1% (dexamethasone plus granisetron group). Response rates were higher over days 4-6 (71.8% and 70.7%, respectively) than over days 1-3 (60.4% and 57.9%, respectively). Significantly more patients who responded to antiemetic treatment during day 0 were responders over days 1-6 (63% vs. 17%; P<0.001). No other treatment-related differences were found. Adverse events tended to be minor, with constipation and headache the most common. Overall, there were no significant differences in the safety profiles of the two regimens, but constipation and abdominal pain were significantly more common in the dexamethasone plus granisetron group.
CONCLUSIONS: Granisetron plus dexamethasone did not appear to confer additional benefit over use of dexamethasone alone in controlling delayed nausea and vomiting following cisplatin chemotherapy. Control of acute nausea and vomiting, however, appeared to be an important factor influencing delayed nausea and vomiting.
AD
Department of Oncotherapy, National Hospital, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
PMID
101
TI
Randomised comparison of ondansetron plus dexamethasone with dexamethasone alone for the control of delayed cisplatin-induced emesis.
AU
Tsukada H, Hirose T, Yokoyama A, Kurita Y
SO
Eur J Cancer. 2001;37(18):2398.
 
The role of 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (HT(3)) antagonists in the treatment of delayed emesis is still controversial. To evaluate whether 5-HT(3) antagonists can add to the efficacy of corticosteroids in controlling delayed emesis, we performed a randomised, prospective, open study comparing ondansetron plus dexamethasone with dexamethasone alone in cisplatin-treated patients. 149 cisplatin-naïve patients with lung cancer received at least 60 mg/m(2) of cisplatin and were treated with dexamethasone 32 mg intravenously (i.v.) and granisetron 3 mg i.v. on day 1. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either dexamethasone 16 mg i.v. alone (arm A) or dexamethasone plus ondansetron 8 mg daily (arm B) on days 2-4. None of the efficacy variables related to control of delayed emesis differed significantly between the two arms. In conclusion, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence to support the prolonged use of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists after 24 h of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy.
AD
Department of Internal Medicine, Niigata Cancer Center Hospital, 2-15-3 Kawagishi-cho, Niigata, 951-8566, Japan. htsukada@niigata-cc.niigata.niigata.jp
PMID