UpToDate
Official reprint from UpToDate®
www.uptodate.com ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

Medline ® Abstracts for References 154,155

of 'Prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults'

154
TI
Systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care: a synthesis of the evidence.
AU
Garcia MK, McQuade J, Haddad R, Patel S, Lee R, Yang P, Palmer JL, Cohen L
SO
J Clin Oncol. 2013 Mar;31(7):952-60. Epub 2013 Jan 22.
 
PURPOSE Many cancer centers offer acupuncture services. To date, a comprehensive systematic review of acupuncture in cancer care has not been conducted. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for symptom management in patients with cancer. METHODS Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane (all databases), Scopus, and PubMed were searched from inception through December 2011 for prospective randomized clinical trials (RCT) evaluating acupuncture for symptom management in cancer care. Only studies involving needle insertion into acupuncture points were included. No language limitations were applied. Studies were assessed for risk of bias (ROB) according to Cochrane criteria. Outcomes by symptom were designated as positive, negative, or unclear. Results A total of 2,151 publications were screened. Of those, 41 RCTs involving eight symptoms (pain, nausea, hot flashes, fatigue, radiation-induced xerostomia, prolonged postoperative ileus, anxiety/mood disorders, and sleep disturbance) met all inclusion criteria. One positive trial of acupuncture for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting had low ROB. Of the remaining studies, eight had unclear ROB (four positive, three negative, and one with unclear outcomes). Thirty-three studies had high ROB (19 positive, 11 negative, and three with bothpositive and negative outcomes depending on the symptom). CONCLUSION Acupuncture is an appropriate adjunctive treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, but additional studies are needed. For other symptoms, efficacy remains undetermined owing to high ROB among studies. Future research should focus on standardizing comparison groups and treatment methods, be at least single-blinded, assess biologic mechanisms, have adequate statistical power, and involve multiple acupuncturists.
AD
Integrative Medicine Program, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 0462, Houston, TX 77030; lcohen@mdanderson.org.
PMID
155
TI
Electroacupuncture for control of myeloablative chemotherapy-induced emesis: A randomized controlled trial.
AU
Shen J, Wenger N, Glaspy J, Hays RD, Albert PS, Choi C, Shekelle PG
SO
JAMA. 2000;284(21):2755.
 
CONTEXT: High-dose chemotherapy poses considerable challenges to emesis management. Although prior studies suggest that acupuncture may reduce nausea and emesis, it is unclear whether such benefit comes from the nonspecific effects of attention and clinician-patient interaction.
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture vs minimal needling and mock electrical stimulation or antiemetic medications alone in controlling emesis among patients undergoing a highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimen.
DESIGN: Three-arm, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial conducted from March 1996 to December 1997, with a 5-day study period and a 9-day follow-up.
SETTING: Oncology center at a university medical center.
PATIENTS: One hundred four women (mean age, 46 years) with high-risk breast cancer.
INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomly assigned to receive low-frequency electroacupuncture at classic antiemetic acupuncture points once daily for 5 days (n = 37); minimal needling at control points with mock electrostimulation on the same schedule (n = 33); or no adjunct needling (n = 34). All patients received concurrent triple antiemetic pharmacotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and carmustine).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total number of emesis episodes occurring during the 5-day study period and the proportion of emesis-free days, compared among the 3 groups.
RESULTS: The number of emesis episodes occurring during the 5 days was lower for patients receiving electroacupuncture compared with those receiving minimal needling or pharmacotherapy alone (median number of episodes, 5, 10, and 15, respectively; P<.001). The electroacupuncture group had fewer episodes of emesis than the minimal needling group (P<.001), whereas the minimal needling group had fewer episodes of emesis than the antiemetic pharmacotherapy alone group (P =.01). The differences among groups were not significant during the 9-day follow-up period (P =.18).
CONCLUSIONS: In this study of patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy, adjunct electroacupuncture was more effective in controlling emesis than minimal needling or antiemetic pharmacotherapy alone, although the observed effect had limited duration. JAMA. 2000;284:2755-2761.
AD
National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Clinical Studies/NIAAA, Room 6 S-240, Mail Stop 1610, 10 Center Dr, Bldg 10, Bethesda, MD 20892-1610, USA.
PMID