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Posttreatment follow-up for men with testicular germ cell tumors

Authors
William K Oh, MD
Jerome P Richie, MD, FACS
Section Editor
Philip W Kantoff, MD
Deputy Editor
Michael E Ross, MD

INTRODUCTION

Testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) have become one of the most curable solid neoplasms, due to improved staging and surgical techniques, the use of platinum-based combination chemotherapy, and the availability of serum tumor markers (beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin [beta-hCG], alpha fetoprotein [AFP], and lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]) to monitor for the response to treatment and the presence of occult disease. For men with testicular GCTs, the five-year survival rate is over 95 percent. (See "Overview of the treatment of testicular germ cell tumors" and "Serum tumor markers in testicular germ cell tumors".)

The follow-up and surveillance for recurrence in men who have completed their initial definitive treatment for testicular cancer will be reviewed here. The use of serum tumor markers during the initial treatment of testicular germ cell tumors is discussed separately.

(See "Serum tumor markers in testicular germ cell tumors", section on 'Monitoring response to therapy'.)

(See "Active surveillance following orchiectomy for stage I testicular germ cell tumors".)

ONCOLOGIC FOLLOW-UP

At the conclusion of treatment, surveillance is appropriate for:

               

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Literature review current through: Nov 2016. | This topic last updated: Wed Jan 06 00:00:00 GMT 2016.
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